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3120bb D275 fifi35 5 



1986 ANNUAL 



REPORT 



// 










MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL 

QUALITY ENGINEERING government documents 

COLLECTION 

h DIVISION OF AUG 2 6 1987 

WATER POLLUTION CONTRQL^ u 

■UfflVBTsity or Massachusetts 
Depository Copy 
Executive Office of Environmental Affairs 
James J. Hoyte, Secretary 

Department of Environmental Quality Engineering 
S. Russell Sylva, Commissioner 

Division of Water Pollution Control 
Thomas C. McMahon, Director 



Publication #14,764-140-200-3-87-C.R. 
Approved by State Purchasing Agent 



DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 
ANNUAL REPORT 
FISCAL YEAR 1986 



TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGES 

ORGANIZATIONAL UNIT PROGRAM DESCRIPTIONS 1-3 

ADMINISTRATIVE OVERVIEW 4-10 

HIGHLIGHTS OF PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS FY'84, '85, '86 11-14 

FIVE YEAR STRATEGIES 1987-1991, PROSPECTIVE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 15-17 

ADMINISTRATIVE BUDGET FUNDS; INCOME RECEIVED 18-21 

BOND FUNDS AS OF JUNE 30, 1986 22-26 

BOND FUND EXPENDITURES, FISCAL YEARS COMPARISON 27-35 

BOND FUND ANALYSIS, FISCAL YEAR RECAPITULATION 36-40 

LEGISLATION 41-48 

FEDERAL/STATE CONSTRUCTION GRANTS TO CITIES, TOWNS, DISTRICTS 49 

FACILITIES PLANNING PROJECTS 50-51 

FINAL CONTRACT PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS 52-53 

BIDDING PROCEDURE AND AWARD OF CONTRACT 54-55 

STATE PLANNING ADVANCES, STATE & FEDERAL GRANTS 56-60 

BOND FUND-STATE PAYMENTS TO CITIES, TOWNS, DISTRICTS 61-64 

STATUS SUMMARY OF ALL CONSTRUCTION GRANT PROJECTS AS OF 6/30/86. .. .65-82 

COLLECTION SYSTEMS CONSTRUCTION GRANTS PROGRAM 83-87 

REGULATORY BRANCH (0&M,PERMITS, GROUNDWATER, ENGINEERING, TECH. ASST 88-98 

CERTIFICATION OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT OPERATORS 99-101 

CHEMICAL COSTS RE IMBURSEMENTS 102-105 

TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH, ADMINISTRATION 106-110 

ENGINEERING SECTION 111-113 

BIOLOGY SECTION; NEW PROJECTS/EXISTING PROJECTS 114-119 

RESEARCH AND DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM 119-122 

WATER QUALITY AND BIOMONITORING 123-124 

CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 124-131 

COMPLIANCE MONITORING 132 

NORTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE 133-135 

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL OFFICE 136 

CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 137-138 

WESTERN REGIONAL OFFICE 139-140 



- 



DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 
ORGANIZATIONAL UNIT PROGRAM BREAKDOWN OUTLINE 

MUNICIPAL FACILITIES BRANCH : 

The State/EPA Construction Grants Program provides financial assistance to 
municipalities and sewerage districts for water pollution abatement projects. 
The recent enactment of Chapter 786 of the Acts of 1985 provides comprehensive 
legislation to continue and accelerate our commitment to cleaning uo the rivers, 
streams and coastal waters of this Commonwealth through this program. This 
legislation authorizes in part an additional $357 million in the construction 
grants program for municipal water pollution abatement projects. 

In the imDlementation of this legislation, provision has been made to allow 
the Federal percentage of project funding to be reduced from the current level 
of 55 percent to 35 percent of the eligible costs. Chapter 786 provides State 
bonding authorization to allow this Division to increase our State matching 
grant to 55 percent, thereby maintaining the municipal contribution at 10 per- 
cent. The net result of these actions will be to increase the number of 
projects that could be funded. With the increased Commonwealth funding, ($75 
million annually for FY-86, 87 and 88), it will be possible to accelerate the 
EPA/State grant program to commence construction on aPDroximately $600 million 
of water pollution control projects during the next three years while Federal 
grants are still available. Pending legislation would convert the Federal 
Dortion of the program from grants to loans by 1990. 

COLLECTION SYSTEMS GRANT PROGRAM : 

The program is administered by DEQE, DWPC and is authorized by M.G.L. c 21 
section 30A as amended by section 4 of ChaDter 557 of the Acts of 1979; ChaDter 
286 of the Acts of 1982 and most recently amended by Chapter 786 of the Acts of 
1985. The Director of DWPC is authorized to make grants to public entities for 
the cost of constructing collection systems, subject to legislative appropriation. 

As originally enacted, grants were made to public entities in an amount not 
to exceed 40% of eligible construction costs or $1.0 million whichever is less. 
Excluded from this $1.0 million limitation are grandfathered (14) projects. The 
original authorization provided $12.0 million for grants from FY-80 through 84. 
Of the $12.0 million, 25% ($3.0 million) was set aside for the award of grants 
to those projects which will provide the greatest economic benefit to the Common- 
wealth (Economic Benefit Projects). 

Currently, funding for the program is extended through FY-89. The annual 
appropriation from FY-86 thru FY-89 is $25.0 million. Generally grants are made 
to public entities in an amount of 50% of eligible construction costs not to exceed 
$3.0 million and the Economic Benefit set aside is set at $4.0 million Der year. 
All unexpended funds at the end of a fiscal year are carried over and made 
available for collection systems projects in the subsequent fiscal year. 



TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH : 

1. Water Quality Section 

A. Lakes and Non Point Source. This program carries out MGL 628 of 
1981, a State Grant Program, which authorizes 3 million dollars 
per year for lake restoration or preservation Drojects. Grants 
are awarded to qualifying public entities for diagnostic-feasibili- 
ty studies, and where recommended additional grants for restoration 
or preservation are awarded. 

B. Rivers. The program identifies the present and potential areas of 
degradation and needed corrective measures for the 1676 miles of 
streams being managed by the Division. 

C. Marine-Coastal. The program monitors and identifies present and 
potential degradation zones in coastal areas, and through planning 
activities recommends corrective measures. 

2. Biology Section 

A. Research and Demonstration. To demonstrate new or improved methods 
of waste treatment, and methods of analysis, monitoring of toxic 
substances; 

B. Water Quality Standards. To coordinate the standards revisions on 
conventional pollutants based on use - attainability and site 
specific criteria, and inventory/classify toxic problems in State, 
and develop criteria for inclusion in standards; 

C. Bio-monitoring. To conduct case studies/field surveys, do 
toxicity assessments, and develop processes that result in toxic 
pollution. 

3. Compliance Monitoring 

The objectives of this program are to insure that permittees are com- 
plying with their permit requirements, and to assist them in correcting 
operational problems. 

REGULATORY BRANCH : 

1. Surface Water Permits, specifying pollutant discharge limitations, are 
issued jointly with EPA through the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System (NPDES). Efforts are underway to obtain the legisla- 
tive, regulatory, and resource requirements necessary to assume State 
delegation of the NPDES Program. 

2. Groundwater Management coordinates subsurface discharge permitting with 
groundwater classification, Title 5 subsurface disposal, septage and 
sludge disposal, the Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program. 

3. Indirect Permits include permits for discharges to wastewater treatment 
plants via sewer connections and extensions and water quality certifica- 
tions issued for any marine structures, and dredging or filling 
activities. 



4. Toxics Control. Chemical toxicity assessments of effluent discharges 
are utilized in review of limitations for NPDES permits, groundwater 
permits, and indirect discharges. 

5. Compliance/Enforcement. To ensure adequate levels of Compliance 
frequent treatment plant inspections are conducted, often resulting 

in enforcement action to correct violations of permits and regulations, 
or other illegal activities. Enforcement actions include notices of 
violation, show course hearings, consent agreements, administrative 
orders, and referrals to the Attorney General for civil and criminal 
action. 

6. Operation & Maintenance, Technical Assistance & Training. Regional 
O&M staff in conjunction with the centralized Technical Assistance and 
training unit, provide technical assistance to wastewater treatment 
plants to improve plant operation, maintenance, and management. 
Additionally, the training section conducts operator training courses, 
seminars, and workshops to increase plant personnel efficiency. 

OPERATOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM : 

This program oversees the Board of Certification of Operators of Wastewater 
Treatment Facilities, which examines, certifies, and issues licenses to orooerly 
qualified operators. 

CHEMICAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM : 

This is a new State program created in 1980 to reimburse municipalities 
50% of the cost of chemicals required for wastewater treatment. 

COMPLAINT INVESTIGATION : 

This program, which handles numerous public complaints of deleterious 
effects of pollution on waters in the Commonwealth, is handled on a case-by-case 
assignment basis according to available resources within the Division. 

DIVISION ADMINISTRATION BRANCH : 

This unit, located in the Boston Central Office, provides overall administra- 
tive, program and resource support for the operations of the three (3) major 
branch and four (4) programs in the Division. Key management accountability 
processes which are utilized to facilitate these efforts include: Annual Program 
and Budgetary Planning; Quarterly Reporting; Five (5) Year Strategy Planning; 
Performance Appraisal. 



DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 



ADMINISTRATIVE OVERVIEW 

The year 1986 has witnessed considerable internal effort by managers at 
examining the Division's 22 current programs in terms of their relative priority, 
future anticipated efforts, and possible sources of funding. Each manager 
evaluated and scored each of the 22 programs according to its impact on: 
(1) public health & safety; (2) environment; (3) ecomonic; (4) political; 
(5) social; (6) program fundability; (7) cost-benefit. The programs, their 
staffing level, and final priority rankings were: 

PROGRAMS FY 85-86 #F.T. 

STAFF 



Construction (Treatment Plants) 


52 


Construction (Collection Systems) 


8 


Plant Operation and Maintenance 


4 


Groundwater Permit - Title 5 


10 


Lakes (Preservation/ Restoration) 


10 


Septage Control/Disposal 


1 


Industrial Waste Control 


7 


Operator Training/Tech. Assistance 


6 


Solid Waste-Leachate/Landfill 


1 


Div. Cent. Admin. T.S.B. Regions 


40 


Compliance Enforcement 





Surface Water Permits 


7 


Plant Operator Certification 


1 


Water Qua!. Toxics Con. 


4 


Water Qual. Planning (Coastal) 


2 


Compliance Monitoring 


6 


Pollution Complaints 


4 


Chemical Reimbursement 


2 


Water Qual. Planning (Inland) 


8 


Public Participation 


2 


Research and Demonstration 


5 



TOTALS 130 

Presently, the budget for a total Divsion staff of 180, is made up of 70% 
Federal, and 30% State funds. There is little doubt that Federal support for 
the Construction Grants, and related Water Quality Planning Program, will 
steadily decline over the next several years. In Fiscal Year 1986, these 
two grant programs totalled $4.1 million, or nearly 60% of the Division's 
total operating budget of $7.3 million. 

The principal problem arises with developing funding for continued 
activities in these two programs. With the planned termination of Federal 
support for these two programs, the Division must obtain an increased share 
of State support to make up, at least, for a substantial part of this loss. 
It should be noted that no other DEQE program has such a high degree of 
program vulnerability due to high dependence (70%) on Federal funding. Yet, 
clearly, the challenge over the next five years is manifesting major effort 
levels all the high priority program areas, with a stable or slowly declining 
resource base to support overall staffing. A Water Pollution Control internal 



ALLOCATION OF PERSONNEL RESOURCES 
DWPC 

% of Effort 

Major Category Subcategory 1980 1986 

Administration (10) Div. Control Admin., TSB, 24.6% 22.0% 

Region, Const. 

Research/Planning (15) Water Quality Planning Coastal 

(19) Water Quality Planning Inland 12.0 

(20) Public Participation 

(21) Research & Demonstration 1.4 



Grants (1) Construction (plants) 

(2) Construction (coll. systems) 
(5) Lakes 



Compliance/ (11) Compliance Enforcement 

Enforcement (16) Compliance Monitoring 

(17) Pollution Complaints 

(22) Emergency Response (spills) 



Total 



1. 


1 


4 


4 


1 


1 


2 


7 



13.4% 9.3% 



28.2 


28.6 





4.4 


3.5 


5.5 



31.7% 38.5% 






5.5 





0.5 


2.8 


3.9 



Regulatory Programs (4) Groundwater Permit - Title 5 

(6) Septage Control/Disposal 

(7) Industrial Waste Control 

(Pretreatment) 

(9) Solid Waste - Leachate/ 0.5 
Landfill 

(12) Surface Water Permits 2.8 3.9 
(14) Water Quality Toxics Control _0 2.2 

5.6% 16.5% 

Plant O&M (3) Plant Operation & Maintenance 1.4 

(8) Operator Training/Tech. Asst. 2.8 

(13) Plant Operator Certification 0.7 
(18) Chemical Reimbursement 



2. 


2 


3. 


3 


0. 


5 


1. 


1 



4.9% 7.1% 






1.1 


1.4 


3.3 


2.8 


2.2 


15.6 





19.8% 


6.6% 


100% 


100% 



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Division of Water Pollution Control 
Administrative Overview 



program analysis indicates that at least 90" of the work of the 22 program 
functions (incl. construction activities) is either charged or mandated by 
State legislation . Many of these functions are contained in the original 1972 
legislation (Ch. 21, s. 26-52). 

The increased reliance on Federal support for construction and related 
activities, starting in the 1970s, negated the need for the State to assume a 

significant support role during this time period. Now we are in the serious 

dilemma of a threatened phaseout of the Division's backbone Federal financial 

support over the next five years, which has mainly been used for water quality 

protection activities mandated by the original Ch. 21 legislation, as well as 
carried on by current public opinion. 

Recently, the Commonwealth has clearly rendered its opinion on continuing 
the work on these mandates thru its passage of over $450 million in State 
construction/rehabilitation funding programs, e.g., Chs. 286 ('82); 472 ('85); 
786 ('85). This will continue much of the abatement activity heavily supported 
by the Fed. since 1976. Now, we must develop the mechanisms necessary for 
turning the federally supported activities, which are State mandated , over to the 
State's responsibility. 

Forward thinking about the Commonwealth's water quality protection needs 
indicates that a substantial future long-term point-source water quality manage- 
ment effort will be required. This will focus on wastewater treatment plant 
upgrading/rehabilitation, and 0&M, in order to keep the plants operating at the 
qualitative level sufficient to meet permit requirements. Total capital rehabilita- 
tion requirements, for over 140 municipal treatment plants, statewide, could 
conceivably be similar to total current construction spending levels ($100 million/ 
year). 

Assuming a continuation of water quality protection activities governed by 
Ch. 31, Laws of 1972, future plant rehabilitation, operation and maintenance/ 
technical assistance, training, and operator certification activities would 
guarantee continuation of a major point-source water quality management program 
well into the 1990s. This coupled with the other increased aspects of industrial 
waste treatment and toxic/hazardous substances, plus continued public response 
needs in the regions, would dictate a total Division staffing level need similar 
to the present, well into the 1990s. 

Clearly, the challenge over the next five years is manifesting major effort 
levels all the high priority program areas, with a stable or slowly declining 
resource base to support overall staffing. Substantially increased State suDport, 
coupled with continued short term Federal support, for construction activities will 
actually accelerate and increase the Division's involvement in construction related 
activities for at least the next 3-4 years. In particular, the focus will be in 
construction activities dealing with CSOs (Combined Sewer Overslors), coupled with 
Inflow/fclnfiltration Rehabilitation, Collection Systems, and Upgrading/Rehabilitation 
of Existing Treatment Plants. A total staff complement of approximately 80 
personnel (out of 130) will be required to direct these efforts. 



Division of Water Pollution Control 
Administrative Overview 



In order to deliver on the construction mandates, as well as perform 
in the areas of groundwater, toxics control increased program expectations, 
and coastal water quality management, the Division will have to play a 
balancing act with, at best, stable total staffing and budget base. 

Combined sewer overflows (CSOs) remain a major water quality concern 
in certain areas of Massachusetts including the Connecticut and Merrimack 
Rivers, Boston, New Bedford, and Lynn Harbors as well as Mt. Hope Bay. 
Over the past several years, CSOs have been addressed, at least in part, 
in the Charles River Basin, the lower Merrimack River and areas of Boston 
Harbor. The Division has drafted a formal policy will become a part 
of the Division's Continuing Planning Process document. This will mean 
increased future administrative activity on the Division's part, including 
the possibility of construction grant awards totalling $100 million or 
more over the next five years. 

The momentum of the groundwater program will absulutely require that 
the current staffing level of seven be maintained. Increasing concern 
is emerging over effects of wastewater treatment facility discharges to 
groundwater in conjunction with present/future public aquifer source 
supplies, versus developing other means of discharging, and the cost- 
benefit comparision of both. This coupled with the importance of proc- 
essing greatly increased numbers of permits for subsurface discharges 
and wells, places critical importance of maintaining a complement of 
seven staff in this program. 

The importance of forging ahead in the toxics control program: of 
developing the critical list of "pollutants of concern", and developing 
modifying effluent or water quality standards guidelines for application/ 
inclusion in permits on a case-by-case basis, will require the present 
staffing level of seven be maintained over the next five years. 

Additionally, the increased coastal /marine water quality program effort 
will require a technical unit of seven people. This unit will oversee 
management efforts in at least 10 estuarine geographical areas, including 
the harbor areas of Newburyport, Gloucester, Salem, Boston, Plymouth, 
Hyannis, Falmouth, New Bedford, as well as the braoder regions of Boston- 
Coastal, Cape Cod Bay, and the basin area of Buzzards Bay. At the present 
time (1986), the limited staff of three are principally concentrating on 
monitoring efforts/analysis of results involving Buzzards Bay and the 
Boston Harbor areas. 



10 



DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 
HIGHLIGHTS OF PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

WASTEWATER TREATMENT CONSTRUCTION GRANTS PROGRAM (FY'84) '(FY'85) ( FY ' 86 ) 

A. Step I Grants Awarded 24 15 10 

State 90% funds in millions of dollars $2.4 $2.1 S3.0 

B. Step II Grants Awarded 19 16 8 

State 90% funds in millions of dollars $6.6 $3.8 $2.9 

C. Construction Grants Awarded 18 13 17 

EPA and State funds in millions of dollars $95.6 $85.5 $138.2 

D. Stepped up emphasis of combined sewer overflow analysis. Principal 
project was initiation of 3 yr. C.S.O. study project on the 
Connecticut River, funded under 205(j) Program. 

E. Established Tier II, 70% State funded grants program awarding 
$20 million dollars annually thru FY'89 to municipalities for 
abatement projects. 

F. Developed the Infiltration Inflow (I/I) Reduction Program, 
providing $100 million in State funded grants to communities for 
the rehabilitation of sewerage collection and transmission 
facilities to reduce infiltration and inflow: 

Number of Projects 3 

Total in millions of dollars $2 

COLLECTOR SEWER GRANT PROGRAM 



A. Number of Collector System Projects Grants 30 28 27 (est) 
Awarded 

B. Number of Contracts Represented 45 34 46 (est) 

C. Dollar Value: State Portion in millions of 21 16 28 (est) 
dollars 

Total Dollar Value in millions of dollars 54 43 69 (est) 

REGULATORY PROGRAM 

A. Ground Water Management Program instituted, including regulations 
for groundwater subsurface permitting, Title 5, and septage disposal 

B. Moved substantially closer to assumption of NPDES delegation 
responsibil ity 

C. Assisted EPA in complementing pretreatment plans for 41 
municipalities, required to treat industrial waste prior to 
discharge into WWTPs 

11 



(FY'84) 
32 


(FY'85) 
66 


(FY 1 86) 
69 


56 


84 


91 1 


20 


84 


48 


8 


66 


25 1 


80 


143 


201 1 


165 
4 


353 
7 


513 

1 

15 



D. NPDES Permits Issued 

E. NPDES Permits Reviewed 

F. Groundwater Permits Drafted 

G. Groundwater Permits Issued 

H. Water Quality Certifications Issued 

I. Sewer Extension Permits Issued 

J. Regulatory Cases Referred to AG 

K. Number of Compliance Monitoring Samples & 
Followups of Permittees 

Major 136 140 189 

Minor 44 48 86 

L. Number of Toxic Waste Samples at Major 

Permittees -- ~ 171 

M. Increased efforts to improve plant operation 
and maintenance through the centralized 
Technical Assistance Unit 

Number of T/A Mandays 

Number of Treatment Plants Assisted 

N. Number of Regional Office 0&M Inspections 

Majors 

Minors 

0. Number. of plants demonstrating significant 0&M 
improvement 
(This is a long term goal) 

P. Number of Title V Plans Reviewed/Sites 
Inspected in Regions 

WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

A. Toxics Program Upstart - Major Reorganization of 
Technical Services Branch to Encompass 
Significant Toxics Efforts, to be Integrated with 
Other DEQE Efforts 

B. W.P.C. R&D/Biological and Monitoring Projects 
Reoriented to Emphasize Toxics Concerns 



12 



300 


400 


679 


10 


12 


49 


272 
182 


290 
185 


340 
317 


5 


8 


8 


352/160 


900/345 


579/344 






10 


9 


7 


7 


5 


4 


20 


66 


54 


24 


18 


20 





1 


1 


20 


66 


54 



(FY'84) ( FY ' 85 ) (FY'86) 

C. Begin Report Focusing on Inclusion of Toxics 
Evaluation/Criteria in the NPDES Review 

Process 1 1 

D. Number of Major Water Quality Surveys 

Conducted 4 4 4 

E. Number of Minor Water Quality Surveys 

Conducted 10 14 33 

F. Number of Major Water Quality Management 
Reports Completed 

G. Number of Model Calibrations for Waste 

H. Load Allocation Reviews. 

Number of Effluent Limits Calculations/Reviews 
for NPDES Permits 

I. Number of Reviews of Wastewater Treatment 
Facilities Plans for Construction 

J. 305(B) Report, Highlighting Water Quality 
Improvements Resulting from Construction 
Grants Program 

K. Number of TSB Reviews for NPDES Permits 

L. Revised Final Draft of Continuing Planning 

Process Document Completed. Ill 

M. Stepped Up Monitoring Activities in Boston/Salem 
Harbor Area. 

CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 

A. Implemented Regulations/Administrative 
Procedures for Ch. 628 Program. 

B. Number of Ch. 628 Grants Made to Communities 32 35 25 

Totaling $3 million ea. year 

C. Total Number of Ch. 628 On-going Grant Projects 32 68 92 

D. Number of Requests for Grant Assistance for 
Funds Under Ch. 628 67 78 60 

E. Reorganize Nuisance Aquatic Vegetation Control 
Program Under W.P.C. Number of Projects 
Managed 7 8 

F. Number of Lake Restoration Projects Underway as 
per Section 314 Program 3 4 4 



13 



(FY'84) (FY'85) (FY'86) 

G. Number of Diagnostic/Feasibility Studies 

Underway, as per Section 314 5 2 1 

H. Number of In-house Studies on Ground Water & 

Non-point Source Pollution 2 3 1 

WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 

A. Number of New Certifications Issued 137 144 171 

B. Total Number of Certifications Issued 2461 2632 2734 

CHEMICAL REIMBURSEMENT PROGRAM I 

A. Dollars Disbursed to Assist Communities for 
the Cost of Chemicals Used in Wastewater 

Treatment Plant Operation $1,813,173 $1,877,574 $2,093,55 

B. Total Dollars Disbursed in FY'84, 85, 86 $5,784,307 I 
MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY PROCESS 



1 1 1 
6 6 6 



A. ComDletion of Finalized Program Plan 
Acceptable to EPA 

B. Completion of Grant Application for Federal 
Monies 

C. Completion of State Budget Requests 1 1 * 

D. Completion and Proper Submission of Quarterly 

Reports to OPPM, FY'85 4 4 4 

E. Completion of the Division Annual Report 1 1 1 
OVERALL ACCOMPLISHMENT OF ONGOING WPC OPERATING PROGRAMS, FY'86 






1. Percentage of Surveyed Stream Miles (1676 miles) 
meeting: Full Support of designated use 

Partial Support of designated use 

2. Initiation of Major Programmatic Efforts into 
Nonconventional Pollutant Control Programs, 
E.G. , TOXICS, and GROUNDWATER. 



48% 
34% 



14 



DWPC 5 YEAR STRATEGIES 

PROSPECTIVE DWPC UNIT PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS 1987-91 

MUNICIPAL FACILITIES BRANCH 

-Oversee more than 60 wastewater/septage treatment facilities, and 
interceptor projects, totalling over one billion dollars in construction 
grants to munipalities. 

-Award approximately $80 million to municipalities for 70% State only 
grants for water pollution abatement projects. 

-Award $175 million in EPA grants toward Boston Harbor Clean-up 

-Award approximately $100 million to municipalities for I/I correction 
projects 

-Award approximately $50 million to municipalities for correction of 
major combined sewer overflow problems in the state. 

-Increase from 51% to 75% of the 1611 miles of major streams meeting 
fishable/swimmable standards. 

-Oversee the plan approval/construction of 10 advanced waste treatment 
plants. 

-Support reauthorization of Federal Clean Water Act by providing to the 
Congressional Delegation, documentation of existing water quality problems. 

-Provide gradual transition from the Federal Grant support program to a 
state/local self-sufficient pollution abatement program. 

COLLECTION SYSTEMS GRANT PROGRAM 

-Oversee over 100 Collection Systems projects with total costs exceeding 
$300 million in state grant assistance to public entities. 

-Award approximately $125 million to public entities for new projects which 
will improve or correct problems dealing with public water supplies;failing 
septic systems; direct discharges; recreation etc. 

-Support and/or provide technical assistance for legislation that will 
extend or increase bond authorization for this program consistent with 
public need. 

-Coordinate this program with those projects of primary concern with the 
EPA/State grant 90% funded program. 

-Accelerate the close out process for grants (estimated at $18.0 million 
per year ) until the backlog has been dissolved. 

TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 

-Oversee over 100 lake diagnostic/feasibility, restoration or preservation 
projects totalling $15 million in state grants to public entities. 



15 



-Effectuate substantial cleanup/improvement in the water quality of 8* 
of the 1636 lakes(10 acres or more) in the Commonwealth. 

-Execute 10 additional intensive diagnostic studies on lakes in the 
Commonwealth. 

-Complete 14 major Basin updates (covering 75" of the Commonwealth area). 

-Complete 34 waste load allocations/total maximum daily loads for 
municipal discharges throughout the Commonwealth. 

-Review 50 wastewater facilities plans for construction. 

-Review 25 plans of study for wastewater treatment plants. 

-Provide recommended effluent limitations for 75 industrial wastewater 
discharges. 

-Complete two(2) biannual 305(b) Water Quality Management Update Reports. 

-Oversee 45 research/demonstration projects totalling $7,000,000 to 
improve methods of water pollution control. 

-At least 20 of these 45 projects oriented toward toxic substance 
analysis, treatment, and control. 

-Inventory and classify major toxics problems in the state via a data 
storage/retrieval system. 

-Oversee the inclusion of guidelines for addressing toxic substances in the 
waters of the Commonwealth. 

-Develop and administer an effective toxics control program through 
effluent limitations/the NPDES permit program, and maintain controls 
thru a monitoring program. 

-Conduct over 2000 compliance samplings of NPDES permittees, with appropriate 
follow up reports/recommendations prepared. 

-Obtain samples for possible toxic materials at 500 NPDES permittees 
with appropriate follow up reports/recommendations prepared. 

-Relocate TSB office quarters based upon projected staffing needs of 50 
personnel . 

REGULATORY BRANCH 

-Massachusetts takeover of NPDES responsibilities 

-Review and issuance/reissuance of 900 NPDES permits. 

-Complete inventory of industries study on problem toxics in Mass., 
and utilize as part of the strategy for an effective toxics control 
program. 

-Toxics control program is effectuated thru inclusion in NPDES permit 
limits, on a site-specific basis. 

16 



-Application of the pretreatment program as a significant component of 
the toxics control efforts. 

-Issue 150 consent agreements, 120 consent orders, 100 administrative 
penalties, and refer 60 violation cases to the Attorney General. 

-Develop/administer an effective groundwater management program. 

-Develop/administer a groundwater discharge permitting system based on 
a permit application process that incorporates a classification, use, 
and standards system. 

-Facilitate an effective statewide Title 5(subsurface disposal of sewage) 
program. 

-Develop strategy/institute an effective program on septage management, 
with controls through the permitting function. 

-Increased treatment plant operation and maintenance/technical assistance/ 
training efforts so that by 1991, 90% of plants are meeting their permit 
standards. 

OPERATOR CERTIFICATION PROGRAM 

-3100 Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators officially certified by 1991. 

-Administrative and program coalescence of these efforts with 0&R/T/A and 
training efforts, with an end product of improved 0&M statewide. 

CHEMICAL REIMBURSEMENT 

-$7 million disbursed to assist communities with the cost of chemicals 
used in wastewater treatment processes. 

PUBLIC COMPLAINTS AND INQUIRIES 

-To handle 1000 complaints/inquiries with appropriate response through 
available Division resources. 

DIVISION ADMINISTRATION 

-Facilitate continued financial resources necessary to accomplish the 
outlined strategies. 

-Obtain alternative resources by 1991 to support up to 70 essential staff 
members on Federal support programs planned for reduction/termination. 

-Facilitate key management accountability processes to render the 
maximum efficiency and effectiveness from the given resources. 

-Facilitate the relocation of the Technical Services Branch into new 
quarters. 

-Participate in DEQE planning activities to consolidate/relocate programs 
and functions for maximum cost and organization operations efficiency. 



17 



ADMINISTRATIVE BUDGET 



Budgetary appropriations for the Division of Water Pollution Control are 
shown in the following table: 

APPROPRIATION 2200-0181 



ACCOUNT 


TITLE 


FY'1985 


FY' 


1986 


01 


Salaries^ Perm. Pos. 


$1,001,555 


$1. 


,101,500 


02 


Salaries, Other 


815,204 


1, 


,124,000 


03 


Services, NON -Employees 


34,100 




43,310 


05 


Clothing 








07 


Lab Supplies & Exp. 


10,052 




6,750 


08 


Heat and Other Plant Oper. 


3^,390 




3,536 


10 


Travel & Auto Expenses 


24,845 




13,800 


11 


Advertising 


21,000 




20,000 


U 


Maintenance 


13,100 




13,000 


13 


Special Studies 


33,550* 




30,245* 


14 


Office & Admin. Expenses 


$5,000 




57,000 


15 


Equipment 


20,478 




13,427 


16 


Rentals 


79,586 




45,000 



TOTALS $2,151,860 $2,501,568 



* Includes N.E. Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission 
the Pro Rata share of State share of Administrative cost. 



18 



WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 
STATEMENT OF FUNDS RECEIVED 
TO JUNE 30, 1986 



DIVISION RECEIPT ACCOUNTS 





GEN.FND. 
MISC. 
INCOME 

$ 3,009 


BOND FND. 
REIMB. 
OIL SPILLS 


BOND FND. 
CURRENT YEAR 
REFUND 


SEWER COLLEC. 
FILING 
FEE'S 


7/31/85 


$ 1,740 


$ 4,800 


8/31/85 


212 






4,900 


9/30/85 


431 


$ 4,825 




5,900 


10/31/85 


460 


23,863 


12,367 


3,900 


11/31/85 


1,294 






3,000 


12/31/85 


5,696 


19,286 


2,775 


3,200 


1/31/86 


11,686 






4,000 


2/28/86 


5,328 






4,600 


3/31/86 


3,997 






4,000 


4/30/86 


183,946 






4,800 


5/31/86 


20,226 




2,696 


4,000 


6/30/86 


13,870 
$250,155 






4,900 


TOTALS 


$47,974 


$19,578 


$52,000 



19 



Statement of Funds Received 
By the 
Division of Water Pollution Control 

and 

Transferred to State Treasurer 

June 30, 1986 



General Fund Receipts : 6/30/86 

Miscellaneous Income $250,155 

Bond Fund Refund 19,578 

Sewer Collection Filing Fee's 52,000 

Reimbursement for Services 

Oil Spillage 47,974 

Total Receipts Transferred to State Treasurer: $369,707 



20 



Sources 

Miscellaneous Income 
Reimbursement Oil Spills 
Bond Fund Current Year Refund 
Sewer Collection Filing Fee's 



State 



TOTALS 



$250, 


,155 


47, 


974 


19, 


578 


52, 


000 


$369, 


707 





21 



BOND FUND 

JUNE 30, 1986 

CHAPTER 687 

ACTS 1966 



APPROPRIATIONS 



REGULAR 



1967 Fiscal Year 



150,000,000.00 



Addition Transfer and Credits 



REIMBURSEMENT PRE -FINANC ING 



FEDERAL SHARE 



1974 Fiscal Year 

1975 Fiscal Year 



2,939,800.00 
379,580.00 



3,319,380.00 



OIL SPILL RECOVERIES 



1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 



Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 
Fisca 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 
Year 



UNALLOTTED APPRORPATIONS 



ALLOTTED APPROPRIATIONS 



1,095.75 

9,787.75 

17,397.56 

32,463.89 

18,101.45 

51,093.84 

1,277.30 

26,000.00 

39,510.77 

33,368.53 

9,117.96 

5,629.34 

39,523.44 

34,268.92 

295,460.87 

85,210.84 

47,973.84 



747,282.05 

154,066,662.05 

678,916.75 

$153,387,745.30 



22 



RESERVE FOR ENCUMBRANCES, BALANCES JUNE 30, 1986 
EXPENDITURES AND UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT 



8,977,172.32 
144,410,572.98 



EXPENDED FUNDS 



1969 Fisca 



1970 Fisca 



1971 Fisca 



1972 Fisca 



1973 Fisca 

1974 Fisca 



1975 Fisca 



1976 Fisca 

1977 Fisca 

1978 Fisca 

1979 Fisca 



1980 Fisca 



1981 Fisca 

1982 Fisca 

1983 Fisca 

1984 Fisca 



1985 Fisca 



1986 Fisca 



TOTAL EXPENDED FUNDS 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



3,909,955.72 

5,794,991.80 

7,481,857.81 

11,598,527.02 

11,696,067.71 

15,806,471.56 

13,286,814.18 

16,320,534.98 

7,668,145.08 

8,371,431.11 

5,162,399.74 

4,288,353.60 

7,621,954.18 

7,376,615.80 

6,862,944.23 

3,459,411.66 

5,287,235.37 

2,265,675.42 



UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT, JUNE 30, 1986 



144,259,380.97 



151,186.01 



$144,449,737.12 



23 



BOND FUND 

JUNE 30, 1986 

CHAPTER 747 

ACTS 1970 



APPROPRIATION 



REGULAR 



250,000,000.00 



1971 Fiscal Year 
TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 
UNALLOTED APPROPRIATIONS 
ALLOTTED APPROPRIATION 
RESERVE FOR ENCUMBRANCES, BALANCE 
EXPENDITURES AND UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT 



250,000,886.00 

226,882.82 

249,774,003.18 

37,931,057.56 

211,842,945.62 



EXPENDED FUNDS 



1975 Fisca 



1976 Fisca 

1977 Fisca 

1978 Fisca 

1979 Fisca 

1980 Fisca 

1981 Fisca 

1982 Fisca 

1983 Fisca 



1984 Fisca 



1985 Fisca 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



Year 



1986 Fiscal Year 
TOTAL EXPENDED FUNDS 
UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT, JUNE 30, 1986 



1,374,137.79 
14,003,351.66 
12,387,045.98 
12,963,574.46 
22,411,019.00 
20,341,842.72 
19,225,645.29 
22,043,613.00 
26,939,521.39 
20,239,916.38 
17,651,806.95 
22,123,509.00 



211,704,988.62 
137,957.00 



24 



BOND FUND 

JUNE 30, 1986 

CHAPTER 286 

ACTS 1982 



APPROPRIATION 
REGULAR 

1982 Fiscal Year 250,000,000.00 
ADDITION TRANSFER AND CREDITS 

1983 Fiscal Year 750,000.00 
* 1984 Fiscal Year -750,000.00 

1986 Fiscal Year 100,000,000.00 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 350,000,000.00 

UNALLOTED APPROPRIATIONS . 214,564,815.95 

ALLOTTED APPROPRIATIONS 135,435,184.05 

RESERVE FOR ENCUMBRANCES, BALANCE JUNE 30, 1986 93,664,921.76 

EXPENDITURES AND UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT 41,770,262.29 

EXPENDED FUNDS 

1983 Fiscal Year 363,602.19 

1984 Fiscal Year 11,342,584.56 

1985 Fiscal Year 10,920,396.14 

1986 Fiscal Year 17,210,063.91 

TOTAL EXPENDED FUNDS 39,836,646.80 

UNENCUMBERED ALLOTMENT, JUNE 30, 1986 1,933,615.49 



* $750,000.00 APPROPRIATION (MCLAUGHLIN FISH HATCHERY) TRANSFERRED TO THE 
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT. 



25 



BOND FUND 
JUNE 30, 1986 

CHAPTER 786 
ACTS OF 1986 



APPROPRIATIONS 



357,000,000.00 



UNALLOTTED FUNDS 



ALLOTTED FUNDS 



357,000,000.00 
-0- 



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40 



Legislation 



The following legislation was enacted into law during the period July 
1, 1985 through June 30, 1986. 

Acts of 1985 

Chapter 133 - An Act authorizing the town of Middleborough to grant 
certain easements 

Chapter 134 - An Act authorizing the County Commissioners of Berkshire 
County to borrow money for a clean lakes program grant for an implemen- 
tation project on Pontoosuc Lake in the city of Pittsfield. 

Chapter 135 - An Act authorizing the town of Easthampton to establish, 
install and construct a hydroelectric power generating facility. 

Chapter 140 - An Act making appropriations for the fiscal year nine- 
teen hundred and eighty six for the maintenance of the departments, boards, 
commissions, institutions and certain activities of the Commonwealth, for 
interest, sinking fund and serial bond requirements and for certain per- 
manent improvements. 

Chapter 144 - An Act authorizing the town of Foxborough to acquire by 
purchase or otherwise, land in the town of Mansfield and to lay sewage 
mains over said land and to connect the same with the sewerage disposal 
system of the town of Mansfield. 

Chapter 145 - An Act to provide fiscal relief to cities and towns. 

Chapter 147 - An Act authorizing the city of Fall River to establish a 
special account for the purpose of making improvements and repairs to the 
municipal incinerator. 

Chapter 149 - An Act authorizing the town of Whitman to acquire sewer 
easements in the city of Brockton. 

Chapter 159 - An Act relative to the debt service schedule for certain 
bonds or notes of the town of Lee. 

Chapter 162 - An Act authorizing the town of Mansfield to establish a 
capital depreciation fund. 

Chapter 170 - An Act relative to the South Essex Sewerage District. 

Chapter 191 - An Act authorizing the city of Pittsfield to use certain 
land in said city for water system improvements. 



41 



Chapter 193 - An Act establishing the Dedham - Westwood Water 
District. 

Chapter 197 - An Act increasing the penalties for the dumping of the 
rubbish on public land, in or near coastal or inland waters or on the pro- 
perty of another. 

Chapter 200 - An Act making appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
June the thirtieth, nineteen hundred and eighty-five to provide for supple- 
menting certain existing appropriations and for certain new activities and 
projects. 

Chapter 216 - An Act authorizing the city of Somerville to enter into 
certain agreements for the use of its municipal incinerator. 

Chapter 228 - An Act making certain corrective changes to the law 
relative to construction in the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 231 - An Act relative to the organization of the Division of 
Law Enforcement, Department of Fisheries, Wildlife and Environmental Law 
Enforcement. 

Chapter 235 - An Act authorizing the establishment of a water supply 
and water distribution system in the town of Westport. 

Chapter 238 - An Act further regulating certain borrowing by cities, 
towns and districts. 

Chapter 239 - An Act relative to mandatory retirement. 

Chapter 263 - An Act relative to the appointment of the city engineer 
in the city of Lowel 1 . 

Chapter 264 - An Act authorizing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to grant a utility easement to the town of Brewster. 

Chapter 266 - An Act establishing a Department of Public Works in the 
Town of Duxbury. 

Chapter 272 - An Act providing for the removal of certain members of 
the Board of Environmental Management. 

Chapter 275 - An Act relative to water conservation. 

Chapter 289 - An Act decreasing certain notice requirements regarding 
the use of common sewers in cities and towns. 

Chapter 293 - An Act authorizing the establishment of a lien upon real 
estate for the unpaid septage disposal charges assessed in connection with 
the Wayland/Sudbury Septage Facility. 



42 



Chapter 295 - An Act establishing the Ashland Water and Sewer 
Commission and defining the powers thereof. 

Chapter 299 - An Act authorizing the city of New Bedford, the town of 
Dartmouth and the Greater New Bedford Regional Refuse Management District 
to enter into a contract for the supply of water to said Town for a term to 
exceed twenty years. 

Chapter 303 - An Act relative to the Martha's Vineyard Refuse Disposal 
and Recovery District. 

Chapter 332 - An Act relative to the qualifications of certain public 
commissions. 

Chapter 335 - An Act relative to the penalties for violations of the 
Air Pollution Control Law. 

Chapter 341 - An Act further regulating payment and periodic estimates 
on sub-bids to contractors on contracts for certain public construction 
projects. 

Chapter 354 - An Act authorizing the Treasurer of Essex County to pay 
certain unpaid bills. 

Chapter 357 - An Act providing for confidentiality of work products of 
mediators, fact finders and arbitrators. 

Chapter 358 - An Act increasing the penalties for violations of the 
sewer regulations of the town of Southbridge. 

Chapter 359 - An Act further regulating the issuance of industrial 
development bonds by municipalities. 

Chapter 370 - An Act providing financing incentitives for cogenera- 
tion, small power production facilities and industrial energy conservation. 

Chapter 373 - An Act establishing a municipal water department in the 
town of Whately. 

Chapter 392 - An Act relative to the Greater Springfield Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Facility. 

Chapter 397 - An Act requiring certain public agencies to follow 
written designer selection procedures. 

Chapter 398 - An Act establishing the Leino Park Water District in the 
town of Westminster. 

Chapter 406 - An Act relative to bid bonds in public works construc- 
tion contracts. 



43 



Chapter 413 - An Act authorizing the establishment of a training 
center for wastewater treatment facility operators in the Upper Blackstone 
Water Pollution Abatement District. 

Chapter 419 - An Act authorizing and directing the Division of Capital 
Planning and Operations to lease a certain parcel of land in the town of 
Framingham to the General Motors Corporation and to convey a certain parcel 
of land in the town of Framingham. 

Chapter 420 - An Act establishing the Chelmsford Center Industrial 
Sewer district. 

Chapter 422 - An Act authorizing the City of Newburyport to dispose of 
a certain parcel of land acquired for the development of water resources. 

Chapter 424 - An Act authorizing the town of Scituate to sell a cer- 
tain parcel of land. 

Chapter 426 - An Act relative to the reconstruction of State Highway 
Route 122 and State Highway Route 56 in the Town of Paxton. 

Chapter 430 - An Act relative to the terms of certain bonds and notes 
to be issued by the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 431 - An Act relative to the Board of Water Commissioners of 
the town of Norton. 

Chapter 435 - An Act authorizing the towns of Dracut and Tyngsboro to 
enter into an agreement with the town of Pelham in the state of New 
Hampshire for the purpose of Watershed Management and Lake Restoration for 
Long Pond. 

Chapter 436 - An Act relative to the Greater New Bedford Regional 
Refuse Management District. 

Chapter 466 - An Act authorizing the lease of certain land in the town 
of Braintree. 

Chapter 473 - An Act authorizing certain terms for borrowing by the 
city of Gardner for wastewater treatment purposes. 

Chapter 488 - An Act relative to the investment of bonds and notes by 
cities and towns. 

Chapter 507 - An Act relative to the eligibility of certain bidders. 

Chapter 521 - An Act relative to extra work or materials, orders and 
claims in certain public contracts. 

Chapter 527 - An Act further regulating entrance requirements for cer- 
tain civil service examinations. 



44 



Chapter 540 - An Act authorizing the Department of Public Works to 
acquire certain land in the cities of Leominister and Fitchburg for highway 
purposes. 

Chapter 547 - An Act further regulating the Department of Public Works 
in the Town of Lenox. 

Chapter 549 - An Act relative to the issuance of bonds or notes. 

Chapter 571 - An Act authorizing cities to issue bonds and notes 
secured by insurance or by letter or lines of credit or other credit 
faci lities. 

Chapter 573 - An Act relative to certain capital outlay 
appropriations. 

Chapter 590 - An Act limiting acid rain and acid deposition. 

Chapter 592 - An Act relative to the establishment of a Massachusetts 
Water Management Act. 

Chapter 595 - An Act further regulating the licensing procedures for 
certain hydropower facilities. 

Chapter 602 - An Act authorizing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to grant three permanent easements in the town of Natick. 

Chapter 603 - An Act authorizing the town of Acton to transfer certain land 
from recreational use to town hall parking and septic system use. 

Chapter 643 - An Act authorizing the establishment of a water improvement 
fund in the town of Saugus. 

Chapter 646 - An Act further regulating the penalties for violation of cer- 
tain hazardous waste laws. 

Chapter 648 - An Act further regulating Group Insurance benefits for state 
employees and retired state employees. 

Chapter 665 - An Act authorizing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to grant to the city of Lowell certain easements over certain park 
land in said city. 

Chapter 674 - An Act establishing safety standards for the rail transport 
of hazardous materials. 

Chapter 675 - An Act relative to awards to certain public construction 
contracts involving public works. 



45 



Chapter 681 - An Act directing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to convey two parcels of land in the town of Rockland to the 
Abington-Rockland joint water works. 

Chapter 695 - An Act authorizing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to acquire a permanent highway drainage easement over a certain par- 
cel of land in the town of Sandwich being used as a water district and to 
transfer care, custody and control of said easement to the Department of Public 
Works for highway purposes. 

Chapter 731 - An Act requiring certain businesses in the city of Peabody to 
file a listing of all chemical and flammable substances used in said businesses. 

Chapter 737 - An Act relative to the appointment and removal of state 
department heads. 

Chapter 739 - An Act further regulating the Upper Blackstone Water 
Pollution Abatement District relative to industrial pretreatment requirements 
and construction of operator training facility. 

Chapter 741 - An Act further regulating the retirement systems of the 
Commonwealth. 

Chapter 742 - An Act providing for certification of backflow prevention 
device testers. 

Chapter 751 - An Act providing that certain public employees may continue 
to work beyond the mandatory retirement age. 



Chapter 756 - An Act establishing the Lake Buel Restoration/Preservation 
District in the towns of Monterey and New Marlborough. 



Chapter 758 - An Act establishing the Northern Berkshire Industrial Park 
and Development Corporation. 

Chapter 763 - An Act to provide annual funding for regional planning 
agencies. 

Chapter 766 - An Act relative to the effective dates of reallocations 
approved by the Personnel Administrator or the Civil Service Commission. 

Chapter 772 - An Act to permit the construction of a town well in 
Hopkinton. 

Chapter 779 - An Act authorizing the Commonwealth to grant certain ease- 
ments for sewer purposes to the town of Tewksbury. 

Chapter 783 - An Act relative to the terms of certain notes to be issued by 
the Commonwealth. 



46 



Chapter 786 - An Act relative to water pollution control and water 
supply conservation. 

Chapter 787 - An Act authorizing the Metropolitan District Commission, Park 
Division, of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to convey to the town of Water- 
town for sewer purposes certain easements for the construction and maintenance 
of sewers and sewer siphons in said town. 

Chapter 808 - An Act providing for the enforcement by the Commissioner of 
Labor and Industries of the procurement of the design service for certain public 
building projects. 

Chapter 811 - An Act providing for an accelerated transportation develop- 
ment and improvement program for the Commonwealth. 



Acts of 1986 

Chapter 3 - An Act relative to the terms of certain bonds and notes to be 
issued by the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 8 - An Act enabling the State Treasurer to issue and sell refunding 
bonds. 

Chapter 10 - An Act establishing the Massachusetts Hazardous Waste 
Insolvency fund. 

Chapter 12 - An Act further regulating the conduct of public officials. 

Chapter 20 - An Act relative to the consolidation of bonds and notes issued 
by cities and towns. 

Chapter 30 - An act repealing the requirement of loyalty oaths for public 
employees of the Commonwealth. 

Chapter 35 - An Act making certain corrective changes in certain general 
and special laws. 

Chapter 45 - An Act authorizing the Commonwealth to grant certain easements 
to the town of Tewksbury for sewer purposes. 

Chapter 46 - An Act establishing the Foxborough Board of Water and Sewer 
Commissioners. 

Chapter 48 - An Act authorizing the acquisition of easements in the city of 
Lawrence by the town of Andover for the construction of certain sewerage 
faci lities. 



47 



Chapter 49 - An Act authorizing the city of Worcester to acquire a easement 
in Crompton Park in said city. 

Chapter 50 - An Act increasing the minibond authorization from twenty-five 
million dollars to fifty million dollars annually. 

Chapter 105 - An Act authorizing the Division of Capital Planning and 
Operations to grant easements in land under the control of the Department of 
Environmental Management to the town of Andover. 

Chapter 115 - An Act authorizing the town of Hull to charge interest on 
unpaid sewer charges. 

Chapter 142 - An Act making appropriations for the fiscal year ending June 
thirieth, nineteen hundred and eighty-six to provide for supplementing certain 
existing appropriations and for certain other activities and projects. 



48 



MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER TREATMENT FACILITIES 
STATE/EPA CONSTRUCTION GRANTS PROGRAM 



Under the Massachusetts Clean Water Act (M.G.L. Chapter 21) as amended, 
the Commonwealth provides financial assistance to municipalities and districts for 
water pollution abatement projects. This program encompasses the planning, design 
and construction of wastewater treatment facilities, major pumping stations, inter- 
ceptor sewers, infiltration/inflow correction and rehabilitation work. For the plan- 
ning and design phases of these facilities, the Division provides a ninety percent (90%) 
state grant; during this past year, eighteen of these grants were made, totalling almost 
six million dollars. Additionally, more than three million dollars were awarded for 
state grants under the Commonwealth's Infiltration/Inflow Program. 

The Division of Water Pollution Control, pursuant to an agreement between the 
Department of Environmental Quality Engineering and the Environmental Protection 
Agency, is delegated the responsibility for administration of the Federal grant program 
which entails most of the procedures necessary for the award of EPA construction 
grants to projects in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Under this program, the 
state provides a fifty five percent (55%) grant coupled with a thirty five percent (35%) 
EPA grant. Through this joint program, nineteen grants were made for construction 
during the past year, representing almost forty five million dollars in state grants 
and eighty four million dollars in EPA grants. 



49 



ENGINEERING REPORTS AND FACILITIES PLANNING PROJECTS 
APPROVED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1986 



GRANT NO. 


MUNICIPALITY 


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 


APPROVAL DATE 


773.03/3 


Abington 


Sewer Use Ordinance 


10/11/85 


833 


Amesbury 


I/I Report 


04/24/86 


295/1 


Attleboro 


I/I Investigations 


01/22/86 


316 


Barre 


Sewer Use Ordinance 


12/31/85 


316 


Barre 


User Charge System 


12/31/85 


719 


Belmont 


User Charge 


02/03/86 


516/3 


Bridgewater 


Preliminary Plan of 
Operation 


08/21/85 


516.01/2 


Bridgewater 


Plan of Operation - Draft 


02/20/86 


516.02/2 


Bridgewater 


User Charge System 


02/20/86 


731 


B.W.S.C. 


0*w*L«0« 


04/16/86 


— 


Comm. of MA 


& M Manual - McLoughlin 
Fish Hatchery 


10/29/85 


658.02/3 


Foxborough 


Sewer Use Ordinance 


09/16/85 


658.02/3 


Foxborough 


User Charge System 


09/06/85 


329 


Gardner 


Sludge Report 


07/15/35 


331 


Greenfield 


<j»<j*C*0* 


10/15/85 


693 


Had ley 


Facility Plan 


12/19/85 


336 


Leominster 


Sludge Management Study 


04/01/86 


724 


Maynard 


Plan of Operation 


03/24/86 


602/1 


Milton 


Facilities Plan 


12/23/85 


789 


M.W.R.A. 


Charlestown P.S. Facility 
Plan 


08/29/85 



50 



GRANT NO. 


MUNICIPALITY 


789 


M.W.R.A. 


839 


M.W.R.A. 


604/2 


Needham 


704.01/1 


Norwood 


524/3 


Orleans 


524/3 


Orleans 


696 


Quincy 


401 


Reading 


663/3 


Somerset 


376-03 


Sturbridge 


796 


Wakefield 


747 


Winchester 


747 


Winchester 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION 

Charlestown P.S. Value 
Eng. 

Residuals Management 
Phase I Facility Plan 

I/I 

S.S.E.S. Phase II Int. Insp, 
& Pilot Rehabilitation 

Plan of Operation 

User Charge System 

Facility Plan 

User Charge 

Preliminary Plan of 
Operation 

& M Manual 

I/I Analysis 

User Charge Study 

S.S.E.S. - Final Report 



APPROVAL DATE 

09/17/85 

04/16/86 

03/18/36 
. 12/05/85 

07/30/85 
07/30/85 
08/28/85 
05/22/86 
05/23/86 

11/01/85 
12/16/85 
11/08/85 
12/10/85 



51 



FINAL CONTRACT PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS 
REVIEWED AND APPROVED DURING FISCAL YEAR 1986 



GRANT NO. 


MUNICIPALITY 


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 




APPROVAL DATE 


295.02/2 


Attleboro 


Cont. #13, Sewer 
Rehabilitation 




09/18/85 


316 


Barre 


W.W.T.P. Upgrade, Pump 
Stations, Interceptors 




10/30/85 


516.01/2 


Bridgewater 


Cont. #1, W.W.T.P. 




03/05/86 


516.01/2 


Bridgewater 


Cont. #2A, Stanley 
Interceptor 




03/05/86 


516.01/2 


Bridgewater 


Cont. #2B, College/Plymoi 
Street 


ith 


03/05/86 


341 


B.W.S.C. 


New East Side Int. - SB, 


4C 


07/16/85 


341 


B.W.S.C. 


New East Side Int. - SB, 


4E 


10/28/85 


341 


B.W.S.C. 


New East Side Int. - SB, 


4D 


03/18/86 


509 


B.W.S.C. 


Joiner Street Outfall 




10/22/85 


746/2 


C.R.P.C.D. 


Shepards Brook Interceptc 


>r 


08/09/85 


89.02/2 


Fall River 


Cont. #2A, 2B, 3A, 3B, 4 




12/05/85 


658/2 


Foxborough 


Cont. #59609, Regional 
Interceptor 




09/10/85 


611/2 


Franklin 


Cont. #1, Sewer 
Rehabilitation 




08/13/85 


611/2 


Franklin 


Cont. #1 




08/27/85 


252 


G.L.S.D. 


Gas Chromatograph 




07/30/85 


252 


G.L.S.D. 


Cont. #4, Spicket River 
Interceptor 




09/30/85 


359 


Greenfield 


Sewer Rehabilitation 




02/12/86 


693 


Had ley 


W.W.T.P. Upgrade, Pump 
Station & Force Main 




10/30/85 



52 



GRANT NO. 


MUNICIPALITY 


590.02/2 


Holbrook 


283 


Lynn 


713 


M.W.R.A. 


713 


M.W.R.A. 


713 


M.W.R.A. 


731 


M.W.R.A. 


731 


M.W.R.A. 


475.05/2 


New Bedford 


524.03/2 


Orleans 


696 


Quincy 


696 


Quincy 


454 


Salisbury 


454 


Salisbury 


456 


S.E.S.D. 


636-01 


Webster 


331 


Westfield 


699 


Wi lb rah am 


347 


Worcester 


347 


Worcester 


347 


Worcester 



PROJECT DESCRIPTION 



Cont. #8, 
Downtown-Rocky Sewer 

Misc. Equipment Contracts 

Upgrade Pump & Power, 
S32-1020-C1A 

Electrical Upgrade, 
S82-1016-C1A 



APPROVAL DATE 

10/16/85 

10/11/85 
09/12/85 

12/20/85 



Chlorination Rehabilitation, 04/18/36 
S82-1020-D2A 

Chelsea Screen House 09/05/85 

East Boston P.S. 09/05/35 

W.W.T.P. Improvements 09/17/85 

Cont. #85-1, Septage 09/30/85 
Treatment Facility 

Quincy Point P.S. 09/16/35 

Quincy Point Interceptor 09/16/85 

Cont. #2, Int. & F.M. 08/15/85 

Cont. #5, W.W.T.P. 08/15/85 

Cont. #81-9A, Beverly 09/11/85 
Harbor Crossing 

(Sludge Vehicles) 11/15/85 

Sewer Rehabilitation 01/31/86 

Interceptor 07/10/35 

Quinsigamond Avenue 08/27/85 
Interceptor - 11A 

Southbridge/Quinsigamond 08/27/85 
Interceptor - 10 

Misc. Equipment Contracts 04/09/36 



53 



WPC # 



REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF 
BIDDING PROCEDURE AND AWARD OF CONTRACT 
DURING FISCAL YEAR 1986 



MUNICIPALITY PROJECT DESCRIPTION 



AWARD DATE AWARD AMOUNT 



296 


Athol 


W.W.T.P. Upgrade 


02/03/86 


$3,230,896 


396 


Beverly 


Interceptor 


06/06/86 


2,076,182 


396-05 


Beverly 


P.S. 


07/17/85 


1,288,840 


341/4C 


B.W.S.C. 


Interceptor 


01/17/86 


2,700,000 


341-06/4B 


B.W.S.C. 


Interceptor 


09/30/85 


3,264,582 


509/30SD 


B.W.S.C. 


Storm Drain Outfall 


12/19/85 


1,167,000 


791/81-7SD 


B.W.S.C. 


Sewer Sep. 


10/03/85 


186,638 


74-1/4 
(State) 


Chicopee 


Interceptor 


03/21/85 


543,147 


671-02/4 


Concord 


Rehabilitation 


10/04/85 


6,535 


746/6 


C.R.P.C.D. 


Interceptor 


06/23/86 


2,335,155 


325/1A 


Falmouth 


W.W.T.P. Vehicles 


03/12/86 


150,000 


658/3 


Foxborough 


Interceptor 


03/25/86 


1,553,930 


611/1 


Franklin 


Sewer Rehabilitation 


06/30/86 


30,114 


329-04/1 


Gardner 


W.W.T.F. 


08/06/85 


10,610,000 


252 


G.L.S.D. 


Equipment 


10/30/85 


29,249 


252/4 


G.L.S.D. 


Interceptor 


01/29/86 


5,147,390 


359/1 


Greenfield 


Sewer Rehabilitation 


06/17/86 


298,570 


693 


Hadley 


P.S. 


06/23/86 


895,743 


378/1 


Leicester 


W.W.T.P. Upgrade 


05/20/86 


2,548,300 


336 


Leominster 


Pretreatment Equip. 


10/11/85 


9,347 


283 


Lynn 


Misc. Equipment 


06/19/86 


96,543 



54 



WPC # 


MUNICIPALITY 


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 


AWARD DATE 


AWARD AMOUNT 


345-03 


Mansfield 


Interceptor 


07/01/85 ■ 


$886,245 


713 


M.W.R.A. 


Deer Is. Pump & Power 


05/15/86 


25,399,465 


713 


M.W.R.A. 


Deer Is. Elect. Upgrade 


04/08/86 


1,949,449 


474.05/3 


New Bedford 


W.W.T.P. Modifications 


06/13/86 


1,013,000 


692/1 


Quincy 


P.S. Rehabilitation 


06/24/86 


433,000 


456-01/13B 


S.E.S.D. 


Interceptor 


10/15/85 


1,366,415 


298-01/2A 


South Hadley 


P.S. 


09/17/85 


96,000 


350-02 


Wareham 


Vehicle Storage Garage 


07/13/85 


63,476 


636 


Webster 


Sludge Vehicle 


03/18/86 


120,437 


331/2 


Westfield 


Interceptor 


03/14/86 


1,929,200 


331/3 


Westfield 


P.S. 


04/08/86 


432,543 


665/1 


Whitman 


P.S. 


02/24/86 


2,871,000 


665/2 


Whitman 


F.M. & Interceptor 


02/24/86 


1,181,799 


665/3 


Whitman 


F.M. & Interceptor 


02/24/86 


1,322,321 


665/4 


Whitman 


Interceptor 


02/24/86 


608,885 


665/5 


Whitman 


F.M. & Interceptor 


02/24/86 


1,451,196 


699/83-16A 


Wi lbraham 


Interceptor 


12/31/85 


598,322 


687/B 


Winthrop 


Sewer Improvements 


11/25/85 


2,737,248 


347/10 


Worcester 


Interceptor 


06/19/86 


2,554,986 



55 



STATE PLANNING ADVANCES - PRELIMINARY PLANNING (STEP 1) 



839 



Proi. 


No. 


Grantee 




Date 
Award 


Total Cost 


i 
Eligible Cost 


i — 
Advance 


840 




Springfield 




9/4/85 


$ 957,717. 


$ 957,717. 


$ 


861,945. 


826 




No. Brookfie 


Id 


10/10/85 


$ 99,773. 


$ 91,205. 


$ 


82,085. 


842 




M.W.R.A 




10/10/85 


$ 279,972. 


$279,972. 


$ 


251,975. 



M.W.R.A. 



7/1/85 ! $ 214,195. $ 185,446. $ 166,901. 



835 



Mashpee 



12/13/85 $ 292,011. $ 289,325. $ 260,392. 



836 



843 



847 



841 



848 



C.R.P.C.D. 



S.E.S.D. 



UBWPAD 




$ 106,620. $ 105,620. i $ 95,058. 



r- 



G.L.S.D. 



Wrentham 



5/29/86 $ 116,765, 



$ 831,364. $ 804,807. $ 724,326. 



5/8/86 I $ 443,680. $ 314,836, i $ 283,352. 



6/30/86 $ 165,000. $ 165,000. 



$ 116,765. $ 105,089. 



TOTALS $ 3,507,097.00 j $3,310,693.00 



$ 148,500. 



$ 2,979,623.0 




STATE PLANNING ADVANCES - FINAL PLANNING (STEP 2) 
















Pro j . No. 


Grantee 


Date 
Award 


Total Cost 


! 
i 

i 
Eligible Cost 




Advance 


676 


Danvers 


9/4/85 


$ 231,267. 


$ 183,854. 




$ 165,469. 


420 


Kingston 


8/27/85 


, $ 687,106. 


$ 419,799. 




$ 377,819. 


753 


Marlborough 


12/13/85 


$ 852,506. 


$ 809,441. 




$ 728,497. 


706 


Hopkinton 


12/13/85 


$ 439,000. 


$ 195,200. 




$ 175,680. 


787 


Pittsfield 


12/10/85 


$ 664,040. 


$ 660,170. 




$ 594,153. 


709 


Webster 


3/25/86 


$ 750,000. 


$ 750,000. 
$ 60,692. 


.... 


$ 675,000. 


626 


Plainville 


4/1/86 


$ 62,100. 


$ 54,623. 


844 


Westborough 


4/2/86 


$ 146,700. 


$ 131,526. 


$ 118,373. 




i 

TOTALS 


$ 3,832,719.00 


$3,210,682.00 


$ 2,889,614.01 
































. 

























57 









STATE GRANTS - ^CONSTRUCTION (STEP 3) 

*(Costs include preliminary/final planning) 




NO. 


GRANTEE 


AWARD 
DATE 


TOTAL COST 


ELIG, COST 


STATE GRANT 


34 1-07 


B.W.S.C. 


8/7/85 


$ 2,692,772. 


$ 2,667,771. 


• $ 400,166. (15%) 


454 


Salisbury 


9/10/85 


$14,956, 178. 


$13, 181,647. 


$ 3.983.122. (35%) 


331-03 


Westf ield 


9/12/85 


$ 2,806,324. 


$ 2,690,645. 


$ 870,992. (35%) 


■ 

713 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 


$32,751,434. 


$ 31,875,224. 


$ 9,416,997. I/A (352 


i 

347-06 


Worcester 9/23/85 


$ 7,802,663. 


$ 7,517,035. 


$ 1,127,555. (158 


524-03 


i 
Orleans 9/30/85 


$ 9,375,300. 


$ 9,375,300. 


$ 2,088,287-. (35%-I/A) 


■ 378-02 


WSD ; 
Leicester 9/23/85 


i 
$ 2,480,910. $ 2,362,316. 


$ 64 1,904. (35%-I/A) 


346 


i j 
C.R.P.C.D. 9/30/85 $ 3,183,873. $ 2,967,929. 


$ 1,071,930. (35%) 


474-05 


New Bedford) 9/30/85 


i 
$ 1,066,884. 


$ 966,857. 


$ 311,608. (35%) 


■- — ■ 1 i 

658 Foxborough ; 9/30/85 


$ 2,596,621. 


$ 2,305,182. 


$ 775,526. (35%) 


696 


Quincy 


9/30/85 


$ 1,710,522. 


$ 1,430,057. 


$ 602,155. (35%) 


456-03 


S.E.S.D. 


— i 
9/30/85 


$ 6,4 14,100. 


$ 5,732,600. 


$ 859,890. (15%) 


640-03 


M.W.R.A, 


9/30/85 


$ 5,074,819. 


$ 4,924,819. 


$ 1,723,687. (35%) 


731 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 $21,880,657. $20,071,102. 


$ 7.084.897. (35%) 


789 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 


$15,062,559. 


$14,126,177. 


$ 4,809,428. (35%) 


693 


Hadley 


3/5/86 


$ 3,514,434. 


$ 2,500,133. 


$ 860.566. (I/A 35%) 


516 


Bridgewater 


3/27/86 


$11,115,720. 


$ 9,343,747. 


$ 2,942,918. (I/A35Z) 


316 


Barre 


5/27/86 


$11,387,089. 


$ 8,019,698. 


$ 4,056,348. (55%) 


713-03 


M.W.R.A. 


6/9/86 


$ 2,120,352. 


$ 2,075,033. 


$ 1,088,868. (55%) 






TOTALS 


$ 157, 993, 211. 0C 


$144, 133,272.00 


$44,716,844.00 


























i 


■ 








1 

': 1 








1 


i 
1 








1 
I 




! 58 







FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT AS AMENDED 



FEDERAL GRANTS - CONSTRUCTION ( Step 3) 



Proj . No. 


Grantee 


Award 
Date 


Total Cost 


Eligible Cost 


Fe 


deral Grant 


34 1-07 


B.W.S.C. 


8/7/85 


$ 2,692,772. 


$ 2,667,771. 


$ 


2,000,828. (75%' 


454-02 


Salisbury 


9/10/85 


$13,981,043. 


$12,592,453. 


$ 


7,956,284.(55%+I, 


331-03 


Westfield 


9/12/85 


$ 2,934,932. 


$ 2,819,253. 


$ 
$ 


1,550,589. (55%' 


713-02 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 


$28,963,960. 


$28,939,193. 


18,741,300. (557. 


347-06 


Worcester 


9/23/85 


$ 7,802,663. 


$ 7,517,035. 


$ 
$ 


5,637,776. (75% 


524-03 


Orleans 


9/30/85 


$ 9,375,300. 


$ 9,375,300. 


6,647,749.(55%+I, 


378-02 


Leicester WSD 


9/23/85 


$ 2,480,910. 


$ 2,362,316. 


$ 


1,415, 785. (55%+I, 


746-02 


L iK#l tLoL't 


9/30/85 


$ 3,060,865. 


$ 2,844,921. 


$ 


1,564,706. (55: 


474-05 


New Bedford 


9/30/85 


$ 1,066,884. 

$ 2,468,050. 
— — . . — 
$ 1,191,526. 


$ 1,015,569. 
$ 2,292,155. 
$ 992,992. 


$ 

$ 


558,563. (55: 


658-02 


Foxborough 


9/30/85 
9/30/85 


1,260,685. (55: 


596-02 


Quincy 


$ 


546,146. (55 


456-03 


S.EoS.D. 


9/30/85 


$ 6,414,100. 


$ 5,732,600. $ 


4,299,450. (75' 


540-03 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 


$ 5,074,819. 


$ 5,159,227. 


$ 


2,708,650. (55 


731-01 


M.W.R.A. 


9/23/85 

j 


$21,880,657. 


$19,961,991. 
$14,126,177. 


$ 


10,979,095. (55 


1789-01 


M.W.R.A. 


9/30/85 

1 


$15,062,559. 


$ 


7,904,131. (55 


1593-02 


Hadley 


3/5/86 


$ 3,477,776. 


$ 2,479,665. 
j 


$ 


1,377, 239. (55%+I 


516-02 


Bridgewater 


3/27/86 


$10,563,865. 


$ 8,887,643. 


$ 


5,465,467.(55%+I 


316-02 


Barre 


5/27/86 


$10,762,376. 


$ 7,444, 128. 


$ 


2,652,848. (35%+I 


1713-03 


M.W.R.A. 


6/9/86 

i 


$ 2, 120,352. 


$ 2,075,033. 


$ 


778,661. (35 




_ 


TOTALS 

1 

i 


$151,375,409.00 


$139,285,422.00 


$ 


84,045,952.00 






















■ 












RQ 





FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ACT AS AMENDED 



FEDERAL GRANTS - CONSTRUCTION ( Step 3) 



Proj . No 



341-07 



454-02 



Grantee 



Award 
Date 



Total Cost 



B.W.S.C. 



Salisbury 



8/7/85 



9/10/85 



$ 2,692,772. 



$13,981,043. 



Eligible Cost Federal Grant 



$ 2,667,771 



$12,592,453 



$ 2,000,828. (75%) 



$ 7,956,284.(55%+I/i 



331-03 



713-02 



Westf ield 



9/12/85 



$ 2,934,932. 



$ 2,819,253, 



$ 1,550,589. (55%) 



M.W.R.A. 



9/30/85 



$28,963,960 



$28,939,193, 



$ 18,741,300. (55%) 



347-06 



524-03 



378-02 



746-02 



474-05 



658-02 



696-02 



456-03 



640-03 



731-01 



789-01 



693-02 



516-02 



Worcester 



9/23/85 



$ 7,802,663. 



$ 7,517,035, 



$ 5,637,776. (75%) 



Orleans 



9/30/85 



$ 9,375,300. 



$ 9,375,300. $ 6,647,749.(55%+!/; 



Leicester WSD 



9/23/85 



$ 2,480,910. 



C.R.F.CeD. 



New Bedford 



9/30/85 
9/30/85 



$ 3,060,865, 



Foxborough 



Quincy 



9/30/85 
9/30/85 



S.EoS.D. 



9/30/85 



M.W.R.A. 



9/30/85 



M.W.R.A. 



9/23/85 



$ 1,066,884 



$ 2,468,050. 



$ 2,362,316. 



$ 1,415, 785. (55%+I/i 



$ 2,844,921. 
$ 1,015,569. 
$ 2,292,155. 



$ 1,564,706. (55% 
$ 558,563. (55% 
$ 1,260,685. (55% 



$ 1,191,526. $ 992,992 



$ 6,414,100. 



$ 5,074,819. 



M.W.R.A. 



9/30/85 



Hadley 



Bridgewater 



3/5/86 



3/27/86 



$21,880,657. 



$15,062,559. 



$ 3,477,776. $ 2,479,665 



$ 5,732,600. 



$ 546,146. (55% 
$ 4,299,450. (75% 



.4— 



$ 5,159,227. : $ 2,708,650. (55% 



$19,961,991. $ 10,979,095. (55% 



$14,126,177 



$ 7,904,131. (55% 



$10,563,865, 



$ 8,887,643, 



$ 1,377, 239. (55%+I/. 
$ 5,465,467.(55%+!/, 



316-02 



Barre 



5/27/86 



$10,762,376 



$ 7,444, 128 



$ 2,652,848.(35%+!/. 



713-03 



M.W.R.A. 



6/9/86 



$ 2,120,352. 



$ 2,075,033 



$ 778,661. (35% 



TOTALS $151,375,409.00 



$139,285,422.00! $ 84,045,952.00 



59 



STATE GRANTS - INFILTRATION/INFLOW 



■ Proj. No. 


Step 


Grantee 


Date 
Award 


Total Cost 


Elig. 
Cost 


Grant 


845 


1 


MWRA 


2/14/86 


$2,188,940. 

$ 76,000. 


$2,080,159. 

$ 75,000. 


$1,872,143. 


1-114 


1 


Pittsfield 


4/8/86 


■ 

$ 67,500. 


1-156 


1 


Reading 


5/1/86 


$ 110,180. 


$ 109,180. 


$ 98,262. 


I- 111 


1 


Danvers 


5/1/86 


$ 100,000. 


$ 100,000. 


$ 90,000. 


1-203 


1 


Williamstown 


5/1/86 


$ 25,611. 


$ 21,614. 


! 
$ 19,453. 


1-195 


1 


Marblehead 


5/7/86 


$ 100,300. 


$ 100,300. 


$ 90,270. 


1-169 


1 


Adams 


5/7/86 


$ 52,876. 


$ 52,876. 


$ 47,588. 


1-120 


1 


Worcester 


5/7/86 


$ 100,975. 


$ 100,975. 




1-104 


1 


B.WoSaC. 


5/5/86 


$ 706,736. 


$ 706,736. 


$ 636,062. 


1-180 


1 


Needham 


5/29/86 


$ 78,506. 


$ 75,420. 


$ 67,878. 


1-147 


i 

j 

i > 


Westwood 


6/2/86 


$ 134,800. 


$ 63,863. 


$ 57,477. 




i 




TOTALS 

i . 


$3,674,924.00 


$3,486,123.00 


$3,137,511.00 






i 

i 

1 
i 




























60 


r-- ■ - 







CONSTRUCTION GRANTS PROGRAM 
BOND FUND 
STATE PAYMENTS TO CITIES, TOWNS AND DISTRICTS 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1986 






WPC No, 

483 

773 

475 

809 

374 

639 

833 

828 

744 

782 

820 

295 

601 

531 

387 

443 

437 

396 

657 

34 1-06 

B34 

B35 

509 

733 

832 

516 

308 

489 

784 

627 

746 

556 

328 

546 

649 

671 

731 

480 

558 

808 

635 

725 

325 

227 

728 

658 

823 

329 



MUNICIPALITY 



FY STATE PAYMENTS 



Abington $ 

Abington 

Acushnet 

Adams 

Agawam 

Amesbury 

Ames bury 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Arlington 

Athol 

Attleboro 

Attleboro 

Auburn 

Bedford 

Bellingham 

Belchertown 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Boston Water & Sewer 

Brewster 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Buckland 

Burlington 

Charlmont 

Charles River Pollution Control 

Chatham 

Chelmsford 

Cherry Valley Sewer District 

Clinton 

Concord 

Dartmouth 

Dighton 

Edgartown 

Everett 

Fairhaven 

Fall River 

Falmouth 

Fitchburg 

Fitchburg 

Foxborough 

Framingham 

Gardner 



10,218. 

1,334. 

185,570. 

15,192. 

48,787. 

12,970. 

68,764. 

95,065. 

543. 

98,950. 

28,983. 

2,660. 

6,948. 

57,861. 

23,586. 

18,311. 

26,826. 

104,923. 

444,151. 

50,688. 

89,166. 

1,416,790. 

72,903. 

12,048. 

46,500. 

193,062. 

341,520. 

525. 

31,427. 

4,080. 

8,617. 

1,069. 

181,807. 

43,030. 

8,726. 

377,698. 

60,644. 

10,317. 

4,748. 

37,962. 

104,226. 

54,952. 

559,283. 

471,940. 

5,624. 

65,322. 

119,879. 

140,806. 



61 



WPC No. 



78-1 

694 

252 

359 

693 

285 

678 

812 

H59 

275 

817 

706 

338 

579 

802 

420 

378 

336 

500 

375 

293 

637 

727 

283 

535 

345 

753 

835 

724 

503 

655 

670 

701 

713 

731 

732 

745 

752 

789 

839 

842 

680 

309 

821 

465 

622 

708 

310 

474-04 

N74 

N75 



MUNICIPALITY 



FY STATE PAYMENTS 



Gloucester 






$' 


537,107. 


Granby 








40,668. 


Greater Lawrence Sanitary Dist. 


710,296. 


Greenfield 








17,663. 


Hadley 








29,521. 


Hatfield 








403,970. 


Haverhill 








28,574. 


Hingham 








29,583. 


Holbrook 








8,927. 


Holbrook 








5,762. 


Holbrook 








58,294. 


Hopkinton 








16,167. 


Hudson 








691,600. 


Hull 








101,303. 


Hull 








94,471. 


Kingston 








66,767. 


Leicester Water Supply Dist. 




195,731. 


Leominster 








250,766. 


Lexington 








17,517. 


Longmeadow 








101,947. 


Lowell 








1,240,707. 


Lowe 1 1 








935,959. 


Lunenburg 








1,047. 


Lynn Water & Sewer 






489,590. 


Maiden 








28,823. 


Mansfield 








386,801. 


Marlborough 








68,852. 


Mashpee 








31,920. 


Maynard 








327,651. 


Melrose 








53,358. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


558,725. 


Mass. Water 


REsources 


Authori 


ty 


377,788. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


47,413. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


1,673,289. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


498,058. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


7,931. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


329,950. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


45,319. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


338,528. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


282,192. 


Mass. Water 


Resources 


Authori 


ty 


87,604. 


Middleton 








60,429. 


Milford 








789,673. 


Milford 








12,526. 


Millis 








111,478. 


Milton 








90,378. 


Montague 








111,152. 


Nahant 








28,671. 


New Bedford 








61,353. 


New Bedford 








87,229. 


New Bedford 








38,313. 



62 



WPC. No, 



MUNICIPALITY 



FY STATE PAYMENTS 



N76 
710 
409 
280 
595 
742 
799 
485 
698 
524 
277 
834 
787 
406 
696 
807 
521 
656 
716 
795 
686 
652 
499 
675 
488 
446 
674 
800 
818 
367 
840 
431 
681 
797 
376 
816 
479 
743 
549 
289 
796 
415 
343 
679 
551 
377 
636 
598 
448 
774 
242 



New Bedford 

New Bedford 

Newton 

North Attleborough 

North Attleborough 

Norwell 

Norwood 

Oak Bluffs 

Orange 

Orleans 

Peabody 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Quincy 

Quincy 

Randolph 

Revere 

Rockport 

Roylston 

Russell 

Rutland 

Salem 

Saugus 

Seekonk 

Shelburne 

Shrewsbury 

Southbridge 

South Essex Sewerage Dist. 

South Hadley 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Stockbridge 

Stoneham 

Stoughton 

Sturbridge 

Swarapscott 

Taunton 

Taunton 

Tyngsborough 

Uxbridge 

Wakefield 

Walpole 

Waltham 

Wareham 

Warren 

Webster 

Webster 

Wellesley 

Westborough 

Westborough 
Webster 



2,377. 

24,919. 

274,915. 

161,925. 

90,039. 

2,994. 

43,046. 

5,371. 

3,614. 

314,943. 

197,824. 

54,603. 

18,242. 

115,691. 

89,702. 

27,200. 

44,922. 

92,239. 

774. 

28,215. 

741. 

63,182. 

422,806. 

13,013. 

267. 

57,382. 

566,020. 

134,867. 

52,577. 

138,820. 

43,877. 

442,574. 

66,751. 

3,411. 

15,430. 

12,896. 

7,557. 

1,168. 

26,847. 

393,373. 

9,715. 

230,257. 

58,561. 

118,994. 

81,318. 

39,838. 

340,173. 

23,259. 

1,405,043. 

92,189. 
4,197. 



63 



WPC. No. MUNICIPALITY FY STATE PAYMENTS 

331 Westfield $ 212,424. 

331-03 Westfield 5,358. 

645 Westfield 5,325. 

326 Weston 2,465. 

824 West Stockbridge 19,236. 

413 Westwood 135,696. 

815 Wilbraham 26,790. 

699 Wilbraham 16,635. 

608 Williamstown 17,296. 

772 Winchendon 59,114. 

794 Winthrop 42,897. 

687 Winthrop 53,673. 

785 Woburn 14,047. 

W35 Worcester 41,480. 

347-05 Worcester 180,879. 

348 Worcester 75,370. 

830 Worcester 38,314. 

TOTAL $ 25,783,999. 



64 



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82 



GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF COLLECTION SYSTEMS 

The Collection Systems Construction Grant Program administered by DEQE, 
DWPC, is authorized by M.G.L. c 21 section 30A as amended by section 4 of 
chapter 557 of the Acts of 1979, chapter 286 of the Acts of 1982 and most 
recently Chapter 786 of the Acts of 1985. The Director of DWPC is 
authorized to make grants to public entities for the cost of constructing 
collection sytems, subject to legislative appropriation. 

As originally enacted, grants were made to public entities in an 
amount not to exceed 40% of eligible construction costs or $1.0 million 
whichever is less. Excluded from this $1.0 million limitation are grand- 
fathered (14) projects. The original authorization provided $12.0 million 
each year for grants from FY-80 thru 84. Of the $12.0 million, 25% ($3.0 
million) was set aside for the award of grants to those projects which will 
provide the greatest economic benefit to the Commonwealth (Economic Benefit 
Projects). 

In it's present form the program is funded through FY-89. The annual 
appropriation from FY-86 and thereafter is $25.0 million of which, $4.0 
million is set aside for Economic Benefit projects. Generally, grants are 
made to public entities in an amount of 50% of eligible construction cost 
or $3.0 million whichever is less. All unexpended funds at the end of a 
fiscal year are carried over and made available for collection systems 
project in the subsequent fiscal year. 



83 



Division of Water Pollution Control 
Col lection Systems 
Grant Program 

Summary of Grants - Fiscal Year 1986 



Public 


557 


Grant 


Total 


Eligible 


Grant 


Entity 


Project 


Award 


Project 


Construction 


Amount 




Number 


Date 


Cost 


Cost 




Agawam 


CS-233 


6-18-86 


3,245,390- 


2,701,591- 


1,350,795- 


Attleboro 


CS-104 


6-25-86 


2,114,680- 


1,540,050- 


770,025- 


Bedford 


CS-114 


1-10-86 


14,670,275- 


12,573,834- 


6,286,917- 


Bel lingham 


CS-196 


6-20-86 


2,281,638- 


1,604,471- 


802,236- 


Bridgewater 


CS-83 


6-25-86 


1,894,634- 


1,235,976- 


617,988- 


Chelmsford 


CS-219 


6-25-86 


8,885,444- 


5,212,949- 


2,606,474- 


Fairhaven 


EB-55 & 


9-03-85 


328,724- 


292,868- 


146,434- 


Franklin 


CS-141 












EB-62 


6-20-86 


6,839,600- 


5,126,030- 


2,563,015- 


Hudson 


CS-243 & 












244 


6-18-86 


1,651,800- 


1,388,300- 


694,150- 


Lee 


CS-106 


6-20-86 


1,450,895- 


1,082,305- 


541,152- 


Mansfield 


CS-239 


6-20-86 


774,000- 


520,270- 


260,135- 


Mattapoisett 


CS-187 


5-01-86 


166,500- 


151,000- 


75,500- 


Methuen 


CS-26 


6-25-86 


8,103,695- 


6,913,200- 


3,000,000- 


Mil lbury 


CS-140 


6-20-86 


3,500,000- 


3,002,250- 


1,501,125- 


Nantucket 


CS-203 


6-25-86 


1,903,783- 


975,526- 


487,763- 


Northborough 


CS-70 & 












233 


6-20-86 


1,991,002- 


1,422,345- 


711,173- 


Norton 


CS-229 


6-25-86 


1,134,985- 


915,491- 


480,632- 


Palmer 


CS-245 


1-10-86 


1,456,034- 


1,173,500- 


586,750- 


Rayham 


CS-221 


6-19-86 


1,919,320- 


1,440,294- 


720,150- 


Saugus 


CS-241 


6-20-86 


652,400- 


489,732- 


244,866- 


Southbridge 


CS-240 


6-18-86 


223,285- 


215,661- 


107,830- 


Tempi eton 


CS-210A 


6-20-86 


664,904- 


537,809- 


268,904- 


Ware 


EB-64 


6-20-86 


913,914- 


162,030- 


81,015- 


Westminster 


CS-155 


3-20-86 
TOTALS 


3,440,273- 


2,878,614- 


1,439,307- 




70,207,175- 


53,556,096- 


26,344,336- 




PRIOR YEAR TOTALS 












FY-81 


49,873,000. 


41,639,401. 


16,540,504. 






FY-82 


17,099,449. 


13,975,137. 


5,227,361. 






FY-83 


31,627,111. 


26,722,371. 


13,238,430. 






FY-84 


54,070,072. 


42,084,662. 


21,042,363. 






FY-85 


42,974,453. 


33,039,372. 


16,373,790. 




TOTALS END 


FY-86 


265,851,260. 


211,017,039. 


98,766,784. 



84 



Division of Water Pollution Control 
Col lection Systems 
Grant Program 

Summary of Grant Closeouts - Fiscal Year 1986 









Public 




557 


Grant 




Original 




Final 


Date 


Entity 




Project 


Award 




Grant 




Grant 


Project 






Number 


Date 




Amount 




Amount 


Completed 


Edgartown 




CS-11 


7-28-80 




70,420- 




88,648- 


11-01-85 


Erving (Farl 


ey) 


CS-49 


6-20-83 




104,203- 




80,753- 


1-21-86 


Ipswich 




CS-44 


12-09-83 




40,000- 




24,649- 


12-16-85 


Nahant 




CS-13 


2-21-81 




341,800- 




317,370- 


4-17-86 


Northbridge 




CS-110 


10-06-82 




115,790- 




75,375- 


1-24-86 


Northfield 




CS-50 


6-10-83 




247,275- 




297,608- 


4-29-86 


Peabody 




CS-39 


6-19-81 




148,000- 




132,174- 


10-01-85 


Walpole 




CS-29 
TOTALS 


12-17-80 
FY-85 


1 


308,000- 




272,606- 






,339,488- 


1 


,289,183- 




PRIOR YEAR 


TOTALS 




















FY-81 




NONE 




NONE 










FY-82 




NONE 




NONE 










FY-83 




869,599- 




687,535.89 










FY-84 


1 


,766,466- 


1 


,444,520.17 










FY-85 


1 


,787,617- 


1 


,512,581- 








TOTALS - 


END FY-86 


5 


,763,170- 


4 


,933,820.06 





85 



Division of Water Pollution Control 
Col lection Systems 
Grant Program 

Summary of Grant Revisions - Fiscal Year 1986 



Grant revisions reflect adjustments due to: 

(1) as-bid adjustments 

(2) increased grant participation to 50% or $3,000,000 
(c. of 1982, c. 167 of 1983 I c. 786 of 1985) 

(3) final project closeout 



Public 


Type of 


557 




Entity 


Adjustment 


Project 


Grant 




(1); (2); (3) 


Number 


Adjustment 


Amesbury 




CS-150 


333,871- 


Ames bury 




CS-150 


43,982- 


Andover 




CS-209 


34,168- 


Ashland 




CS-162 


( 52,071-) 


Ayer 




CS-46 


( 3,115-) 


Bedford 




EB-43 


( 178,514-) 


Boston Water & Sewer 




EB-42 


114,085- 


Boston Water & Sewer 




EB-42 


15,855- 


Burl ington 




CS-38 


( 23,983-) 


Concord 




CS-130 


( 186,522-) 


E. Longmeadow 




CS-27 


1,495- 


Edgartown 




CS-11 


( 10,493-) 


Erving 




CS-49 


( 13,803-) 


Fairhaven 




EB-55/CS-82 


( 682-) 


Foxborough 




CS-55 


( 386,534-) 


GLSD 




CS-27 


19,724- 


Haverhil 1 




EB-54 


( 202,742-) 


Hopedale 




CS-185 


1,088- 


Hull 




CS-123 


( 256,351-) 


Ipswich 




CS-44 


( 9,386-) 


Ipswich 




CS-182 


4,236- 


Leicester W.S.D. 




CS-28 


21,403- 


Manchester 




CS-217 


2,037- 


Medford 




CS-41 


( 113,561-) 


Nahant 




CS-13 


( 24,987-) 


Newburyport 




EB-03 


( 63,185-) 


Newburyport 




CS-206 


( 18,684-) 


Northampton 




CS-143 


( 20,722-) 


Northampton 




CS-121 


26,851- 


Northbridge 


3 


CS-110 


( 13,687-) 


Northfield 


3 


CS-50 


( 35,400-) 


Peabody 


3 


CS-39 


815- 


Salisbury 




CS-99 


( 98,709-) 


Taunton 




CS-189 


( 455-) 


Taunton 




CS-189 


( 3,827-) 


Tewksbury 




CS-151 


( 30,508-) 


Tewksbury 




CS-218 


148,100- 


Walpole 




CS-149 


92,952- 


Walpole 


3 


CS-29 


( 31,341-) 


Warren 


1 


CS-163 


13,175- 



86 



Division of Water Pollution Control 
Col lection Systems 
Grant Program 

Summary of Grant Revisions - Fiscal Year 1986- 



Grant revisions reflect adjustments due to: 

(1) as-bid adjustments 

(2) increased grant participation to 50% or $3,000,000 
(c. of 1982, c. 167 of 1983 I c. 786 of 1985) 

(3) final project closeout 



Public 


Type of 


557 








Entity 


Adjustment 


Project 






Grant 




(1); (2); (3) 


Number 






Adjustment 


Westfield 




CS-148 






588,832- 


Westwood 




CS-146 






( 13,317-) 


Weymouth 




CS-138 






( 154,274-) 


Whitman 




CS-45 






( 124,584-) 


Wil liamstown 




CS-43 






( 36,219-) 






TOTAL 


FY- 


-86 


( 644,987-) 




PRIOR YEAR 


TOTALS 














FY- 


-81 


-(1,146,169.) 








FY- 


-82 


-(3,623,270.) 








FY- 


-83 


+ 2,181,095. 








FY- 


-84 


-( 710,106.) 








FY- 


-85 


-(1,979,207.) 




TOTALS 


END 


FY- 


-86 


-(5,922,644-) 



87 



REGULATORY BRANCH 



Pollution abatement activities of the Regulatory Branch include the 
Operation and Maintenance, Discharge Permit Program, Ground Water 
Protection, Technical Assistance and Training, Complaince and Enforcement, 
and Engineering Sections. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 



To ensure an effective pollution abatement program, good operation and 
maintenance of the wastewater treatment plant is essential. While replace- 
ment and upgrading of outmoded and overloaded plants is scheduled, main- 
taining proper operational prodecures minimizes environmental problems. 

Via the following means, the Division encourages proper operation and 
maintenance of the wastewater treatment plants: 

Plant Inspections 



Field engineers conduct periodic inspections of the treatment plants to 
maintain adequate levels of compliance. Regulations, filed with the 
Secretary of State, define proper operation and maintenance of waste treat- 
ment systems. 



Technical Assistance and Operator Training 

Technical assistance, in terms of specific plant recommendations, is 
provided to improve the performance and standards of treatment plants. In 
addition, to increase efficiency, operator training courses and wastewater 
seminars are offered to treatment plant personnel. 

Operator Certification 

The mandatory operator certification program administers biannual exa- 
minations and interim emergency certifications to proviae assurances that 
plant operators are qualified to assume responsibilities at the treatment 
plants. 

Operating Records 

From monthly operating reports, submitted for review, engineers are 
able to determine the efficiency of treatment, level of compliance, and 
possiblity of problems. 

Permit Discharge Program 

Permits, required for all wastewater discharges into the waters of the 
Commonwealth, are issued through the National Pollutant Discharge 
Elimination System (NPDES), Sewer Extension and Connection Program, and the 
Ground Water Discharge Program. Permitting activities regulate effluent 
limitations, according to an established classification system for water 
resources. 



88 



Sewer Use Ordinances 

The Division requires that municipalities enforce regulations for the 
control and use of public sewerage systems, designed to protect sewerage 
systems and ensure that discharged wastes do not inhibit satisfactory 
treatment plant performance. 

PERMITS 

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 established 
a national discharge permit program to control all point discharges into 
the nation's waters. The Act provides that the permit program, or National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES), be administered by the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency unless EPA has approved the administration 
of the program by the State. The 1977 Amendments to the Act state that it 
is the policy of Congress that the states take over the permit program. 

In 1973 the Division and EPA Region I entered into an ageement for the 
issuance of joint permits under their respective statutory authorities. 
This agreement will remain in effect until the Commonwealth's permit 
program receives EPA approval. The application for delegation of the NPDES 
program was formally submitted in 1983 and subsequently, discussions ensued 
among the Division, the Attorney General's Office, and EPA Region I to 
resolve issues associated with the delegation process. Regulations 
establishing permit procedures, the surface and groundwater discharge per- 
mit programs, groundwater quality standards and requirements for hazardous 
waste management facilities were promulgated as a prerequisite for the 
delegation of the NPDES program. During FY'86 an amendment, addressing 
legal issues associated with the Memorandum of Agreement, particularly in 
the areas of self-incrimination protection, confidentiality of information, 
and injunctive relief for threats of violations of the Act, advanced to the 
House Ways and Means of the legislatire. 

The 1972 Amendments to the Clean Water Act stipulated that permits 
could be issued for a period not to exceed five years. Consequently, many 
of the previously issued permits are now expiring. In addition, more 
stringent treatment requirements have become the new program goal, along 
with an increased emphasis on the control of toxic and hazardous pollu- 
tants. As a result, a new round of permit re-issuance is underway as well 
as continuation of initial issuance of industrial permits, usually non- 
contact cooling water discharges. 

Since the inception of the joint permit issuance program, over 1300 
permits have been issued or reissued by the Division and EPA. This inclu- 
des permits for all major municipal and industrial dischargers in the 
Commonwealth. During the period from July 1, 1985 through June 30, 1986 
109 NPDES permits were issued or reissued. 



89 



In addition to the NPDES permit program, over 2600 sewer extension or 
connection applications have been processed and more than 2100 water 
quality certifications have been issued under authority of Section 401 of 
the Federal Act, with 508 sewer permits and 182 water quality certifications 
issued during FY 1986. 

NPDES Permits Drafted , 93 

NPDES Permits Issued 109 

Sewer Extension/Connection Permits Issued 508 

Water Quality Certifications Issued 182 



GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 

As part of a comprehensive DEQE groundwater management program to pro- 
tect the Commonwealth's groundwater and surface water resources, the 
Division has developed a groundwater classification program and a per- 
mitting program for discharge of pollutants. 

The Massachusetts Groundwater Quality Standards (314 CMR 6.00) and 
Groundwater Discharge Permit Program (314 CMR 5.00) were established in 
1983 to address the issue of groundwater protection. Accomplishments in 
these programs include establishing a classification system for ground- 
waters, developing a groundwater discharge permit program, determining 
resource needs, and preparing a preliminary administrative program. During 
FY'86 progress continued toward an initial state-wide classification of 
groundwaters to protect the most sensitive use. Detailed review of 
requests for Class III designation are on-going. Three (3) initial eva- 
luations were completed, recommended for approval to the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Commission, and subsequently approved by the Commission. 

Groundwater management activities further advanced in analyzing the 
problems of permitting existing septage facilities, continued inventory and 
assessment of underground injection wells under the UIC program, and coor- 
dination of Title 5 (subsurface disposal of sewage) policies and practices. 

Groundwater Permits Drafted 70 

Groundwater Permits Issued 38 

Groundwater Site Visits and Inspections 46 

UIC Sites Registered (Number of Wells) 6 (50) 



90 









COMPLIANCE AND ENFORCEMENT 

Frequent treatment plant inspections are utilized to maintain proper 
operational procedures and adequate levels of compliance. Enforcement 
action is taken to correct violations of permits, regulations, .or other 
illegal activities. Actions include Notices of Violation, Administrative 
Orders, and referrals to the Attorney General's Office. Technical 
assistance is provided to enforcement in the preparation of evidence and 
oversight of remedial measures. During FY'86, 48 Administrative Orders 
were issued and 24 cases were referred to the Department of the Attorney 
General for legal action. 

Notices of Violation 114 

Administrative Orders 48 

Cases Referred to the Attorney General's Office 24 



ENGINEERING 



The Engineering Section approves reports and plans of pollution abate- 
ment facilities and inspects facilities for conformance with approved 
plans, according to Section 27(g) of the Mass. Clean Waters Act. During 
FY'86, 33 engineering reports and plans on industrial wastewater treatment 
were reviewed. The engineering staff also conducted 95 post construction 
inspections of industrial wastewater treatment plants for compliance with 
plans and reports. As needed, technical assistance and engineering exper- 
tise was provided to industries and their consultants. 

Engineering Reports and Plans 

Photofabrication, Inc. - Milford 

Whitman Plating Co., Inc. - Whitman 

Reliable Electroplating - Chartley 

Ledkote Galvanizing - Everett 

MWRA - Industrial Waste Report #21 

New England Power - Brayton Point 

Holyoke Energy Resource Recovery - Holyoke 

Microfab, Inc. - Amesbury 

Polysar, Inc. - Leominister 

Circuit Fab - Chelmsford 

BP Oil, Inc. - Revere 

Hasbrouck Property - Belchertown 

The Mil 1 - Chelmsford 

Leach & Gardner Co. - Attleboro 

Water Treatment Plant Sludge - Cambridge 

Memtek Corp - Woburn 

GTE - Needham 

Operation of WWTP Volume #4 

Browning - Ferris Industries (BFI) 



91 



Engineering Reports & Plans 

Industrial Waste Course Review 

Chicopee WWTP - Sludge Incinerator Improvements 

Cape Cod Potato Chip - Hyannis 

495/3 Tech Center - Chelmsford 

Boston Edison - Walpole EIR 

Texas Instruments - Attleboro 

The Foxboro Co. - Foxboro 

The Foxboro Co. - East Bridgewater 

Tracker Services - New Bedford 

Gurry Plant - New Bedford 

MWRA - Industrial Waste Report #1 

Parker Metal Corp. - Worcester 

Crane Co., Inc. - Worcester 

Northeast Utilities - Mt. Tom Station 

The Engineering Section provides technical support to the Permitting, 
Construction Grants, and Enforcement Sections, as well as to the Regional 
and Westboro Offices. The Engineering Section reviewed 79 industrial NPDES 
permits, 72 sewer connections and extensions, 14 groundwater or 
subsurface water permits, and 4 closure plans. 



National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES Permits) 

Clinton Plastics, Inc. 

Sturbridge Isle 

Tremont Nai 1 Co. 

Brookfield Wire Co. 

Power Products Inc. 

Amstar Corp. 

Cumberland Engineering Co. 

Ixy Enterprises 

Spencer Press Inc. 

Texon Inc. 

Dennison National Co. 

Agri-Mark Inc. 

Northampton Mfg. Corp. 

Brockton Sole & Plastics 

Berkey Film Processing 

Eastern Etching Mfg. 

General Electric Lowell 

Sarama Industries/Fall River 

Lynn Water Treatment Plant 

Tewksbury Water Treatment Plant 

BIW Cable Systems/No. Dighton 

BIW Cable Systems/Taunton 

Micro-Abrasives Corp./Westf ield 

Goodyear Tire and Rubber/New Bedford 



92 



National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits Cont 

USM Corporation-Whitman 

Metal Bellows Corp. -Sharon 

Carol Cable Co., Inc.-Wil liamstown 

Whitman Plating Co. -Whitman 

Seaman Paper Co. -Otter Paper 

New Engalnd Brass Co. -Taunton 

AT&T Tech-North Andover 

Guilford Industries-Douglas 

Gloucester Corp. -Lynn 

Texas Instrument-Attleboro 

Chang I Sons Enterprises-South Deerfield 

Kendall Corporation-Colrain 

C. Ray Randall Mfg. Co., Inc. -North Attleboro 

B&J Mfg. Corp. -Attleboro Falls 

Whiting & Davis Co., Inc-P 1 ainvi 1 le 

L.G. Balfour Co. Plant #2-North Attleboro 

L.G. Balfour Co. Plant #l-North Attleboro 

The Robbins Co. -Attleboro 

Foster Metal Products, Inc. -Attleboro 

Lambert Anodizing Co., - Attleboro 

Handy & Harmon (E lectronics )-North Attleboro 

Handy & Harmon (Ref ining)-Attleboro 

Mt. Vernon Silver Co./Gorham-Attleboro 

Walton & Lonsbury, Inc. -Attleboro 

Cook-Horton Division-North Attleboro 

Swank, Inc. -Attleboro 

Leach & Gardner Co. -Attleboro 

Raytheon-Lowel 1 

Aldren, WPI-Holden 

General Electric Co.-Pittsf ield 

I.C.I. America Inc.-Dighton 

Rowes Wharf Limited-Boston 

Braeburn Development Corp.-Tyngsboro 

Gould Inc.-Newburyport 

Coastal Metal -Merrimac 

Superior Printing Ink Co. -Marlboro 

Millbury Resource Faci lity-Mil lbury 

Shrewsbury Residue Landfill-Shrewsbury 

Creative Biomolecules, Inc.-Hopkinton 

Vernon Russell Water Filtration Plant-Middleton 

Nometco, Inc. -Ware 

Automatice Rolls of N.E. -Auburn 

Robertson Brothers-Abington 

Battelle NEMRL-Duxbury 

General Dynamics Corp-Quincy 

McCord Winn, Inc. -Winchester 

Exxon Company, USA-Everett 

Cambridge Bio-Science-Hopkinton 

Mass. Maritime Academy-Buzzards Bay 

Millis Water Supply Wells (#1 and2)-Mil lis 

Deerfield Specialty Paper, Inc. 

Bourbeau Estates-Newburyport 

New England Power-Brayton Point 

Kelly Company, Inc-Clinton 

Erving Paper Mills-Erving 

93 



Sewer Connections Permits 

Plastic Craft Novelty - Attleboro 

Kilmartin Industries - Attleboro 

AVCO System Division - Wilmington 

Adams Realty Trust - Quincy 

Vernon Plastics Co. - Haverhill 

Bondi Island Sanitary Landfill - Springfield 

Bondi Island S.L.G.C.S. - Springfield 

Wilbraham Tie-in - Springfield 

Krew Inc. - Attleboro 

Moleculon Biotech, Inc. - Cambridge 

R.F. Simmons - Attleboro 

Qual-Craft, Inc. - Attleboro 

Signal Environmental - Worcester 

Friendly Ice Cream - Springfield 

Synthon Industries - Chelsea 

MM Realty Trust - Medford 

Mass Protein Products - New Bedford 

Wang Labs - Tewksbury 

ARCO - Sturbridge 

New England Shrimp - Ayer 

Maynard Plastics - Salem 

L.G. Balfour - Attleboro 

Preston Manchester - Nantucket 

Pallas Photolabs - Marlboro 

Ratheon Equipment Division - Marlboro 

Takemmy Laundry - Vineyard Haven 

A.J. Knot Tool & Mfg. - Milford 

L.G. Balfour - No. Attleboro 

Polymer Tech. Corp. - Wilmington 

Digital Equipment Corp. - Andover 

St. Joseph's Hospital - Merrimac 

ENSECO - Cambridge 

Mil lipove-Waters Assoc. - Merrimac 

Riverdale Mills Corp. - Northbridge 

Advanced Industries - Attleboro 

Vernon Plastics Co. - Haverhill 

Sanitary Landfill - Lowell 

EMC-Eastern Manufacturing Corp. - Amesbury 

Photofabrication Engineering Inc. - Milford 

Roy Brothers - Billerica 

Mercury Anodizing - Newburyport 

Datell Division of Intersil - Mansfield 

Locke Drive Limited Partnership c/o Northland Realty - Marlboro 

Oxford Pickle Co. - South Deerfield 

Wyman-Gordon Co. - North Grafton 

Hycomp-Cedar Hills Realty Trust - Marlboro 

Texas Instruments, Inc. - Attleboro 

Alamo Rent-A-Car - Boston 

C. Walsh Company - Boston 

After Market Services - Hyannis 

C.C.&F. Wellington Circle Trust/Boston - Medford 

Vernon Plastics Co. - Haverhill 



94 



Sewer Connections (Cont.) 

N.E. Electropol ishing - Fall River 

CD-CDA Realty Trust - Canton/riingham 

Quincy Lanfill - Quincy 

Wang Laboratories - Haverhill 

South Shore Art Center - Cohasset 

Ainslie Corp. - Braintree 

C.R. Randall Mfg. Co. - No. Attleboro 

Texas Instruments - Mansfield 

BFI - Randolph 

Rosemar Silver Co. - No. Dighton 

Atriam Associates - Raynham 

Alloy Computer Prod. - Marlboro 

Handy I Harmon - No. Attleboro 

Leominster Water Treatment 

Chase Laundry - Barnstable 

Baldwinville Products - Templeton 

Josten, Inc. - Attleboro 

Warren White - Danvers 

Electro Signal Lab - Rockland 

Eastern Manufacturing Corporation - Amesbury 



Sub-Surface or Groundwater Discharge Permits 

Cohasset Landfill - Cohasset 

Kilburn Glass - Norton 

Mi 1 lis Corp. - Mil 1 is 

Bay State Circuit - Northboro 

Axton-Cross - Hoi 1 is ton 

Alfax Paper & Engineering - Westboro 

Broleco Leather - Peabody 

Nuclear Metals - Concord 

Robert J. Moran Inc. - Littleton 

Lista International Cor. - Hoi 1 i ston 

Johns-Manvi 1 le Corp. - Billerica 

L.B. Darling - Southborough 

Brookfield Wire Co. - West Brookfield 

Seragen - Hopkinton 



Closure Plans 

James River - Fitchburg 
Walton & Lonsbury - Attleboro 
Reliable Electroplating - Chartley 
Seekonk Manufacturing - Seekonk 



95 



Pretreatment programs are developed by local government and munici- 
palties as required by the Clean Waters Act of 1977 and the General 
Pretreatment Regulations for Existing and New Sources of Pollution of 1978, 
The pretreatment programs, submitted to the Construction Grants section, 
are then reviewed by Engineering. During FY 86, Engineering reviewed 15 
pretreatment plans for the following communities: 

North Attleboro 

Brockton 

Clinton 

Ames bury 

Marlboro 

SESD 

Springfield 

Webster-Dudley 

Bil lerica 

Chicopee 

Holyoke 

South Hadley 

New Bedford 

Northampton 

Miller Falls 



Tax benefits to industries installing pollution abatement facilities 
are provided by Chapter 63 and Chapter 59 of the General Laws. Industries 
wishing to apply for these benefits require certification from the Division 
that the facilities are effective in controlling water pollution to an 
acceptable level and comply with applicable provisions of the Mass. Clean 
Waters Act. During the period of July 1, 1985 through June 30, 1986, the 
following companies were granted tax certification: 



Tax Certifications 

Polaroid - Waltham 

Erving Paper - Erving 

Boston Edison - Everett 

SESD - Salem 

Riley Leather Co. - Woburn 

Chemfix Technology 

Boston Edison - L Street and New Boston 



96 



The Engineering Section participates in the Water Toxics Work Group, 
convened in November of 1983, to develop methodology to control toxics in 
wastewater, determine priorities, and investigate the use of toxicity 
testing. During FY'85, the engineering section participated in 
Right-to-Know compliance activities, assessed limits for toxic organics 
identified in groundwater discharge applications, compiled an index of all 
inorganic and organic chemicals reported in permit applications, and 
deployed the Office of Research and Standard's system for calculating 
aquatic life criteria methodology to screen NPDES permits for toxic chemi- 
cals of concern. 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 



The Technical Assistance and Training section provides technical 
assistance to wastewater treatment plants and training to the plant opera- 
tors. Developmental activities of this unit have focused on staffing, per- 
sonnel training, and establishing a central training facility. This unit 
has been operating out of space provided by the Upper Blackstone Water 
Pollution Abatement District (UBWPAD) at its treatment facility in 
Millbury, pending approval of a federal grant which will fund construction 
and equipment for a permanent facility at the Millbury site. 

The technical assistance group works directly with wastewater treatment 
plant personnel in their plants to provide "over the shoulder" assistance 
to upgrade plant operations. This may include process control analysis, 
laboratory techniques, or additional training in a number of areas that can 
affect plant operations. During FY'86 technical assistance, on site 
inspections, and operational evluations were provided to the following 
treatment plants: 

Middleboro WWTP 

Douglas WWTP 

Cohasset WWTP 

Fall River WWTP 

MA Maritime Academy 

Chatham WWTP 

Bridgewater WWTP 

Amesbury WWTP 

Marlboro - Easterly Plant 

Barnstable WWTP 

Newburyport WWTP 

Charles River Water Pollution Control District 

Monroe Bridge WWTP 

Billerica WWTP 

Thompson Island WWTP 

Merrimac WWTP 

Old Rochester Regional High School 

Scituate WWTP 

Warren WWTP 

Upper Blackstone Water Pollution Control District 



97 



The training section presents a 12 week basic course in wastewater 
treatment plant operation at least twice a year at locations throughout the 
state. In addition, numerous seminars are routinely offered. 

Five operator training courses were offered to wastewater treatment 
plant operators with approximately thirty-five (35) persons attending each 
class. The twelve week sessions were conducted at the University of 
Lowell, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Bridgewater State College, 
and the Marlboro Easterly Wastewater Treatment Facility. In addition, 22 
seminars were conducted on wastewater related issues including: main- 
tenance management, chemical conditioning of sludge, operation and main- 
tenance of pumps, filter operations and performance, and NPOES laboratory 
procedures. Over six hundred (600) operators participated in these semi- 
nars. 

The training staff also developed an intensive industrial waste opera- 
tors course, provided in-house training concerning WWTP operations, coor- 
dinated Title 5 (subsurface disposal of sewage) training for municipal 
officials, and introduced OPTRAIN, a computerized training simulator. The 
OPTRAIN system runs a model treatment plant, which resembles a real proto- 
type plant, allowing the wastewater treatment plant operators to control 
various plant components and processes. Utilization of the OPTRAIN system 
in training plant operators has provided a new medium to promote effective 
plant operation, maintenance, and management. 

Additional duties performed by the Technical Assistance and Training 
unit include: reviewing operation and maintenance plans and manuals for 
WWTPs in planning and design phases; providing O&M bulletins and technical 
assistance reports to division personnel; reviewing Operator Certificate 
examinations; working with the Board of Certification to determine the 
grade level rating of publicly owned wastewater treatment plants; deve- 
loping the Comprehensive Plant Evaluation program to assess the standards 
and performance at WWTPs; and reviewing and approving contract operations 
proposals. During FY'86, contracts were reviewed and approved for the 
following communities: 

Swampscott 

Southbridge 

Leominster 

Templeton 

Gardner 

Warren 

North Brookfield 

Chatham 



98 



Mandatory Certification of Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators 



Massachusetts had conducted a voluntary certification program in con- 
junction with the New England Water Pollution Control Association for many 
years. 

On August 26, 1970 then Governor Sargent signed into law an Act 
Establishing a Board of Certification of Operators of Wastewater Treatment 
Facilities. This Act required the following. 

1. That the nine(9) member Board of Certification of Wastewater 
Treatment Plant Operators be established to ensure the proper management, 
operation and maintenance of wastewater treatment facilities. 

2. That a fee of ten(10) dollars be required for the original cer- 
tificate of competency and an annual fee of five(5) dollars be required for 
renewal thereafter. A new fee structure was established during fiscal year 
1981 by the Department of Administration and Finance through passage of 
Chapter 499 of 1980 (An act increasing certain licensing fees) and Chapter 
572 of 1980 (An Act authorizing the Commissioner of Administration and 
Finance to set fees and charges paid to the Commonwealth) this new fee 
structure has been established as twenty (20) dollars for the original cer- 
tificate of competency (examination fee) and an annual fee of twelve(12) 
dollars for renewal thereafter. A new fee of fifteen (15) dollars was 
established for the issuance of emergency certification. 

3. That no person, corporation, city, town or district shall operate 
a treatment facility used for treating, neutralizing or stabilizing 
wastewater from homes, public buildings, commercial and industrial 
establishments unless the person in charge of the treatment facility has a 
certificate of competency issued by the Board of Certification of 
Wastewater Treatment Facilities. The present board policy also requires 
that the Assistant Chief Operator, Shift Operators and/or Week-End Opera- 
tors, if utilized, must have a certificate of competency. This requirement 
for mandatory certification applies to municipal, industrial pretreatment 
facilities discharging to municipal sewerage systems and ground water 
discharge facilities emptying into the ground water of the Commonwealth. 
Thus all wastewater treatment facilities discharging to either ground or 
surface waters of the Commonwealth must have certified operators in the 
positions of Chief Operator, Assistant Chief Operator, Shift Operators 
and/or Week-End Operators, if utilized. Violation of the mandatory cer- 
tification requirement is punishable by a fine of not more than twenty five 
hundred (2,500) dollars per day of such violation. 



99 



4. That any individual, who files an application for a certificate of 
competency prior to July 1, 1972 and with such date being extended by the 
General Court during the legislative year of 1973 to July 1, 1974 and pro- 
vided further that one was employed as an operator at a wastewater treat- 
ment facility in Massachusetts on July 1, 1971 would be eligible for 
certification under provisions of the Grandfather's Clause of the enabling 
legislation. All others seeking certification shall pass an examination 
prepared by the Board of Certification of Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operators or shall be granted certification by means of a reciprocal 
agreement amongst the various states prepared and approved by the above- 
mentioned Board of Certification. 

5. The Board through its Rules and Regulations has set the following 
policies, "The Chief Operator is in responsible charge during all working 
hours of the wastewater treatment facility". "In any Grade four(4) or 
lower wastewater treatment facility which has an eight (8) hour day, 
seven(7) days per week operation, the chief operator must have a cer- 
tification rating equal to the grade of the plant, and during the absence of 
the operator in charge, the plant must have a certified operator (assistant 
chief operator) with a certification rating not less than one grade below 
the rating of the facility and for those Grade four(4) or lower facilities 
which utilize shift and or. week-end operators, the shift and week-end 
operators also must have a certification rating not less than one grade 
below the rating of the facility. For Grade five(5), six(6), or seven(7) 
plants the operator in charge must have a certification rating equal to the 
grade of the facility. During his absence, the operator in charge 
(assistant chief operator) also must have a certification rating equal to 
the grade of the facility. If shift and/or week-end operators are uti- 
lized, the shift and/or week-end operators must have a certification com- 
mensurate with the duties one is performing at any given time. These 
ratings are determined by the Board based upon information submitted by the 
faci lity. 

6. The Board of Certification of Operators of Wastewater Treatment 
Facilities has established a set of rules and regulations in addition to 
application forms for the certification program. 

7. The Honorable Governors of the Commonwealth have appointed the 
members who serve on the Board of Certification of Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Operators. The Board holds regulatory scheduled monthly meetings to 
conduct business properly before the Board and to establish policy as 
necessary. The board further administers two(2) examinations per calendar 
year. These examinations are held in January and July of each year. 
Despite the restrictions and budgetary constraints imposed by Proposition 
2± and other local, state and federal fiscal constraints, the Board of 
Certification of Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators clearly states that 
the wastewater treatment facilities within the Commonwealth must continue 
to meet the requirements of mandatory certification and that these facili- 
ties must be operated and maintained in accordance with the laws of the 
commonwealth. 



100 



Chapter 606 of the Acts of 1983 transferred the Board of Certification 
of Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators from the Division of Registration 
in the Executive Office of Consumer Affairs to the Division of Water Pollu- 
tion Control of the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering within 
the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. This very important 
legislation now allows the Board to more properly administer its legislati- 
vely mandated affairs, decisions and policies. The budgetary, administra- 
tive and financial duties of the Board can now be carried on by the 
personnel directly responsible for conducting the affairs of the Board. 
Considerable changes in the collection of renewal fees, examination pre- 
paration and notification, the review process and in-house methods for the 
administration of the Board day-to-day affairs are being realized. This 
change has now resulted in a more efficient operation of the Board and is 
now a corner stone of the Board's activities during the time period for 
this report. 

The Board anticipates in the future separate examinations for 
industrial and municipal wastewater operators, a program to oversee the 
contract operations mode of operation and maintenance at wastewater treat- 
ment facilities and a new grandfathers certification program for pretreat- 
ment industrial wastewater treatment plant operators. 

As of June 30, 1986 the Board has certified under the aspects of the 
original Grandfather's Clause, reciprocal agreements and examinations two 
thousand eight hundred twenty four (2,824) operators. 



101 



Chemical Costs Reimbursements 



This program - Chemical Costs Reimbursements - within the Division of 
Water Pollution Control of the Department of Environmental Quality 
Engineering was established through the passage of Chapter 510 of the Acts 
of 1980 (An Act authorizing reimbursement by the Commonwealth to cities, 
towns and districts for the annual costs of chemicals for the operation and 
maintenance of water pollution control facilities). This legislation 
allows a city, town or sewerage district to apply to the Division of Water 
Pollution Control for fifty(50) per cent reimbursement of the costs of che- 
micals utilized for chlorination, sludge dewatering, odor control, and 
advanced waste treatment for phosphorous removal and nitrification during 
the operation and maintenance of a water pollution abatement facility. 

The operation of the program has been established in the following 
manner: 

1. The eligible chemical costs incurred at a wastewater treatment 
plant shall be from the preceding fiscal year period and shall be ascer- 
tained for the period by each city, town or sewerage district 

2. These ascertained costs shall be submitted by the eligible munici- 
pal bodies to the Division of Water Pollution Control for verification as 
to accuracy and eligibility - before the end of the subsequent calendar 
year. Reimbursements under this program shall be paid from either the 
annual or supplementary budgets under budgetary control item # 2240-0500. 
The funding mechanisms as stated in the enabling legislation cites the 
Local Aid funding process as stated in Section 18A of Chapter 58 of the 
Massachusetts General Laws. Once the amounts of monies necessary for reim- 
bursement have been determined, normal practices and procedures as outlined 
by the Comptroller and Treasurer of the Commonwealth are followed and the 
reimbursement procedures take place. 

The program is now established on an annual basis upon the yearly sub- 
mission of costs incurred by a governmental entity during the previous 
fiscal year. 

The request for reimbursement from each eligible city, town, or sewerage 
district must be submitted to the Division of Water Pollution Control uti- 
lizing the following procedure: 

1. The list must designate the types of chemicals, the amounts of 
chemicals and the unit costs of the chemicals used. 



102 



2. The costs must be certified by the auditor in cities and districts 
and by the accountant in towns. Certification must contain the statement 
that the types, amounts and costs of the chemicals pertain only to those 
chemicals used in a wastewater treatment facility for chlorination, sludge 
dewatering, odor control and advanced waste treatment for nitrification and 
phophorous removal during the operation and maintenance of said wastewater 
treatment faci lity. 

3. Once verified by the Division of Water Pollution Control as eli- 
gible for reimbursement and sufficient funds for payment have been provided 
by both the Budget Bureau of the Department of Administration and Finance 
and the General Court, a list of cities, towns and sewerage districts and 
the amount of reimbursement to be provided to each is submitted to the 
Comptroller and Treasurer of the Commonwealth for payment. 

Chapter 292 of the Acts of 1982 (An Act relative to the annual reim- 
bursement of the acts of chemicals for the operation and maintenance of 
certain water pollution control facilities) made odor control chemicals 
eligible for the program. 

During the fiscal period July 1, 1984 through June 30, 1985 the 
Division of Water Pollution Control determined the eligible cities, towns 
and sewerage districts and the reimbursement payments to each city, town 
and sewerage district. 

The monies for the anticipated reimbursements to the eligible cities, 
towns and sewerage districts with the dollar amounts (before verification) 
provided as follows: 

Adams $ 12,626. 

Amesbury 5,232. 

Amherst 20,163. 

Athol 2,300. 

Attleboro 44,960. 

Ayer 16,334. 

Barnstable 22,493 

Billerica 14,807 

Blackstone 507. 

Bridgewater 2,294. 

Brockton 56,643. 

Buckland 1,353. 

Charles River Pollution Control District 35,405. 

Charlton 326. 

Chicopee 21,264. 



103 



Cohasset 5,210 

Concord 2,612 

Dartmouth 8,648 

Deerfield 1,519 

Douglas 1,264 

Dudley 284 

East Bridgewater 375 

Easthampton 14,221 

Edgartown 475 

Erving 75,769 

Fairhaven 24,289 

Falmouth 273 

Fall River 118,715 

Fitchburg 132,766 

Gardner 2,464 

Gloucester 16,749 

Grafton 5,802 

Great Barrington 9,848 

Greater Lawrence Sanitary District 101,614 

Greenfield 3,789 

Hadley 430 

Hardwick 164 

Haverhill 63,129 

Holyoke 34,295 

Hoosac Water Quality District 31,614 

Hopedale 3,176 

Hudson 6,961 

Hull 375 

Huntington 819 

Ipswich 7,963 

Lee 525 

Leicester Water District 146 

Lenox 1,424 

Leominster 50,885 

Lowell 16,454 

Lynn 20,667 

Manchester 718 

Mansfield 16,348 

Marion 296 

Marlboro 68,303 

Marshfield 3,073 
Massachusetts Water Resource Authority-Sewer Div. 981,234 

Massachusetts Water Resource Authority-Water Div. 2,576 

Mattapoisett 250 

Maynard 1,524 

Medfield 6,262 



104 



Merrimac 




937 


Middleboro 




7,092 


Milford 




8,987 


Mil lbury 




932 . 


Millis 




132 


Montaque 




6,249 


New Bedford 




62,747 


Newbury port 




9,929 


Northhampton 




25,786 


North Attleboro 




11,071 


Northbridge 




3,602 


North Brookfield 




1,855 


North Field 




450 


Orange 




2,372 


Oxford - Rochdale Sewer District 




210 


Palmer 




12,686 


Pepperell 




870 


Pittsfield 




19,119 


Plymouth 




2,760 


Rockland 




13,439 


Rockport 




2,570 


Royalston 




59 


Russell 




333 


Scituate 




5,243 


Shrewsbury 




5,117 


Somerset 




13,142 


Southbridge 




5,656 


South Essex Sewer District 




186,561 


South Hadley 




23,103 


Spencer 




1,075 


Springfield 




134,193 


Stockbridge 




2,751 


Sturbridge 




863 


Sunderland 




327 


Swampscott 




5,854 


Taunton 




32,954 


Tempi eton 




30,520 


Upper Blackstone Water Pollution 


Abatement Dist. 


, 45,110 


Upton 




270 


Uxbridge 




2,450 


Ware 




4,238 


Wareham 




12,378 


Warren 




4,117 


Wayland 




8,414 


Webster 




1,175 


Westboro 




1,505 


Westfield 




17,385 


Wilbraham 




3,234 


Winchendon 


TOTAL 


471 




2,745,687 



105 



TECHNICAL SERVICES BRANCH 
ANNUAL REPORT 



Administration Section 

During FY'86, personnel administration continued to be the longest and 
most time consuming ongoing task. Interviews, selection and fiscal 
juggling to accomodate salary changes have consumed significant amounts of 
time and effort. The updating of job specifications and duties, prepara- 
tion of Form 30' s and Form 40' s, as well as many other forms needed for out 
of state travel and the like, were amoung the many functions performed. 
Considerable effort has also gone into the preparation and follow-up on 
expense vouchers for Technical Services Branch personnel. 

The single most time consuming element of this activity continued to be 
the conduct of performance appraisals for all employees assigned to the 
Technical Services Branch. This activity continued to be worthwhile, by 
better defining responsibilities and expectations of supervisors and subor- 
dinates, which has resulted in a more efficient use of time and resources. 

The hiring of personnel also continued to consume a large block of 
time. The following new personnel were hired during FY'86: 

1. Biochemist (8/11/85) 

2. Associate Environmentalist (9/15/85) 

3. Assistant Sanitary Engineer (9/15/85 

4. Senior Civil Engineering Draftsman (10/27/85) 

5. Junior Biochemist (10/27/85) 

6. EDP IV (2/16/86) 

7. Environmental Bioengineer (3/3/86) 

8. Chief Aquatic Biologist (3/3/86) 

9. Assistant Sanitary Engineer (4/6/86) 

The following promotions were effected during FY'86: 

I. Assistant Aquatic Biologist to Aquatic Biologist (8/4/85) 
.2. Sanitary Biologist to Associate Environmentalist (9/1/85) 

3. Senior Chemist to Sanitary Biologist (10/27/85) 

4. Aquatic Biologist to Sanitary Biologist (10/27/85) 

5. Aquatic Biologist to Sanitary Biologist (10/27/85) 

6. Chief Aquatic Biologist to Sanitary Biologist (10/27/85) 

7. Assistant Sanitary Engineer to Senior Sanitary Engineer (12/29/85) 

8. Assistant Sanitary Engineer to Senior Sanitary Engineer (12/29/85) 

9. Assistant Aquatic Biologist to Aquatic Biologist (2/23/86) 

10. Assistant Aquatic Biologist to Aquatic Biologist (2/23/86) 

II. Biochemist to Chief Aquatic Biologist (3/3/86) 

12. Senior Accountant to Grants Management Specialist III (4/6/86) 



106 



Twelve (12) seasonal (summer) employees were selected and assembled. 
Their contribution was significant once again as all proved to be willing 
and hard workers. The continued cooperation of the Division of Employment 
Securities and area colleges and universities contributed to the success of 
this venture. Several student intern employees were also hired during the 
course of FY'86, providing valuable assistance to regular staff members. A 
basic computer program was written which enabled the Administrative staff 
to monitor salary costs by employee and by account. This has proved to be 
quite valuable by providing up-to-date information as to the status of our 
various salary accounts. 

In the area of hardware, no new vehicles were acquired during FY'86. 
The oldest vehicle were in need of frequent repairs which at times were 
accomplished by section personnel in order to keep the vehicles functioning 
and to save time and money. Excellent cooperation by the Motor Vehicle 
Management Bureau resulted in the receipt of additional vehicles on loan, 
as they have become available. This partially relieved the annual vehicle 
shortage experienced by the Technical Services Branch during survey season. 

Watercraft remained in generally good condition, thanks in part to con- 
tinuous maintenance. The month of June 1986, was the busiest ever for 
whaler trips, with 20 carried out. This necessistated the institution of a 
system of signing marine equipment in and out in order to adequately moni- 
tor inventory. All three boat trailers were serviced and kept in generally 
good condition. Much in the way of supplies and equipment were provided in 
support of surveys conducted by the Lake, Marine, Water Quality Management, 
Research and Demonstration, Compliance Monitoring and Biology Sections. 

Once again, the Technical Services Branch had a significant number of 
reports printed by Central Reproduction. Twenty-seven (27) new reports, 
were submitted, printed and returned. In addition, ten (10) non-report 
projects were submitted, printed and returned. A substantial effort has 
gone into researching various computer assisted drafting systems, which 
would result in the production of more sophisticated graphics and the abi- 
lity to utilize various geographic information systems. This aspect alone, 
in the context of non-point source problems, makes such a system 
attractive. 

Activities related to the new physical plant consumed less time than 
during the previous year. At this time, the Technical Services Branch is 
ready to begin the design phase of its new building as soon as necessary 
funds are made available through the Capital Outlay Budget process. The 
only major change in the original concept during the past year has been the 
elimination of the DEQE Central (Worcester) Regional Office as part of a 
consolidation effort. They are no longer being included as a design con- 
sideration. With imminent destruction of the central power plant, the 
Westview Building was equipped with its own boiler as a source of heat. 
Steam traps still have to be installed throughout the building. 



107 



I 



FY'86 was the third full year in which a Senior Accountant was assigned 
to the Technical Services Branch. In April 1986, it was upgraded to Grants 
Management Specialist III, a reflection of the complexity and size of the 
work load. This position has had a profound effect on the operation, as 
budgeted funds have been effectively utilized to provide much needed 
supplies and maintenance. Additionally, this has continued to. result in 
invoices being processed promptly and assuring vendors of payments in a 
timely manner. 

A significant amount of time was expended in dealing with a variety of 
administrative items for the Clean Lakes Program. The Chapter 628 program 
contributed a large number of substate agreements, contracts and invoices 
to be reviewed. Some additional time was spent reviewing Section 314 
(Federal Clean Lakes Program) and Chapter 722 documents. A table of 
Technical Services Branch expenditures follows: 





EXPENDITURES 
FISCAL YEAR 1986 




SUBSIDIARY 


FUND SOURCE 






AMOUNT 


Services 


State 
Federal 






$ 8,747 
$41,646 


Clothing 


State 
Federal 






-0- 
$ 1,003 


Laboratory 
Suppl ies 


State 
Federal 






$ 9,411 
$20,495 


Building 
Operations 


State 
Federal 






$ 706 
$ 85 


Travel 


State 
Federal 






$ 8,372 
$14,976 


Advertising/ 
Printing 


State 
Federal 






$ 2,777 

$ 455 


Maintenance/ 
Repairs 


State 
Federal 






$ 7,973 
$ 1,008 


Special Supplies 
and Expenses 
(Nautical ) 


State 
Federal 






$ -0- 
$ 3,746 



TOTAL 



$50,393 



$ 1,003 



$29,906 



$ 791 



$23,348 



$ 3,232 



$ 8,981 



$ 3,746 



108 



EXPENDITURES (CONTINUED) 
FISCAL YEAR 1986 



SUBSIDIARY 


FUND SOURCE 


Office and 
Administration 


State 
Federal 


Equipment 


State 
Federal 


Rentals 


State 
Federal 


Totals 


State 
Federal 



AMOUNT 

$ 43,452 
$ 9,947 



$ 3,564 
$ 65,569 



$ 11,149 
$ -0- 



$ 96,151 
$158,930 



TOTAL 



$ 53,399 



$ 69,133 



$ 11,149 



$255,081 



Other Sources: 



Bond Funds 



Research and Demonstration 
Clean Lakes and Great Ponds 
Aquatic Nuisance and Weed Control 
Federal Clean Water Act (314) 
Total Expenditures: 



$ 489,972 
$ 805,141 
$ 99,584 
$ 29,152 
$1,678,930 



EDP Section 

The year's highlight for the EDP Section was the arrival of two IBM 
PC-XT systems complete with internal modems, dot-matrix printers, multico- 
lored plotter, Laserjet printer, and 10+10 Bernoulli Box. Software for the 
systems included Lotus 123, dBase III, Smartcom, FORTRAN, Chartmaster, and 
BASIC (the year's lowlight, by the way, was the theft of a complete set of 
software and documentation for dBase III). The systems have been well 
received by the TSB Staff as evidence by their near 75% average usage rate. 



109 



A close second was the arrival of an EDP Programmer IV to the section. 
He has been responsible for much of the systems administration of the two 
PC's. He has also been active in developing database management systems 
for riverine, marine, and biological data. He is serving as our liaison to 
the Lawrence laboratory for both data exchange and for assistance in their 
preparation of an ADP Plan for automating the Lawrence laboratory. 

The riverine, marine, and biological databases are being developed 
intitially under dBase III on the PC's. The initial database structures 
are in place. Testing of the systems and data entry will begin early in 
FY'87. Preliminary "user-friendly" procedures for data retrieval and mani- 
pulation are being developed. As all of these databases are expected to 
become quite large, it is intended that the data eventually reside under 
the SIR DBMS at UMass. Additionally, plans are being made to develop pro- 
cedures to provide the data in compatible formats to various US EPA databa- 
ses as requested. 

The PALIS (Ponds and Lakes Information System) database remained in a 
state of flux throughout the year although it is edging ever closer to 
becoming a wel 1 -functioning system. Data entry for TSB-generated data was 
on-going throughout the year but is currently about one year behind. Data 
from consultants under the Clean Lakes Program have only recently begun to 
submit their data: to date only data for 2 lakes have been received for 
entry (data for 6 other lakes were returned for editing and should be 
received shortly). Six significant requests for data retrieval were 
fulfilled during the year. The EDP Section will continue to manage PALIS 
for the foreseeable future although long-range intentions are to turn admi- 
nistration of the database over to the Lakes Section. 

No ADP plan was submitted during the past fiscal year. A recently 
completed survey of TSB Section needs and plans with regard to data pro- 
cessing needs will be used to formulate a plan shortly. 

AF29's for continuation of timesharing services at UMass and Regents 
computer centers were submitted for FY'87. 

As usual, the amount of time spent .in assisting users was significant. 
This was especially so with the arrival of the microcomputers. Not only 
did the hardware and software have to be set up, but office staff had to be 
introduced on basically a one-by-one basis to the new system and to most of 
the individual software packages. Now that there is a good core of users 
for each system and software package, part of this teaching process can be 
undertaken by these users. 

An interim plan to exchange data via CPT word processor diskettes bet- 
ween the TSB and the Lawrence laboratory was established. Work is on-going 
to make the arrangement more efficient through electronic means. 

With the experience gained from using the microcomputers during the 
last few months and with user needs and requests in mind, the EDP Section 
will be better able to plan for future data processing needs. The long 
term needs will concentrate on data processing needs for the new buidling. 



110 



Engineering Section 

Water Quality Monitoring Surveys 

Intensive water quality surveys were conducted during the summer and 
fall on the Hoosic River in response to numerous requests from local resi- 
dents and to integrate water column and sediment data with fisch and 
macroinvertebrate sampling being conducted by the Biology Section; on the 
Housatonic River to update water quality conditions; on the Blackstone River 
to document water quality conditions before the completion of a major CSO 
project; on Boston Harbor to document water quality conditions and to 
investigate areas of PCB and PAH contamination; and on Buzzards Bay 
Program. Monthly monitoring of the Assabet River, begun in December of 
1984, was continued to provide current water quality data on the river in 
the areas of the Shrewsbury and Westborough wastewater treatment plants. 

Synoptic surveys were conducted to update baseline water quality data 
on the Chicopee River, the Westfield River, the Nashua River, the Millers 
River, and on numerous streams in the North Coastal Basin. 

In January, a Marine Section was formed. The coastal monitoring 
responsibilities, formerly conducted by the Basin Planning Section, were 
transferred to the Marine Section, and two members of the Basin Planning 
Section were transferred to the new section. Thus, the sampling of 
Buzzards Bay and Boston Harbor in the 1986 sampling season was conducted by 
the Marine Section with the assistance of Basin Planning staff. A signifi- 
cant commitment of the Basin Planning personnel has been made to assist the 
Marine Section field work. 

The 1986 field program for the Basin Planning Section also included an 
intensive survey of the Merrimack River which was conducted to update water 
quality and sediment data, evaluate the effect of New Hampshire wastewater 
discharges near the state line on the Merrimack, and evaluate water quality 
effects on shellfish. The program of synoptic surveys was continued. 
Water quality surveys were conducted to update baseline water quality data 
for the Sudbury River, Concord River, Taunton River, Neponset River, and 
the Charles River. 



Reports and Evaluation of Water Quality 

The following water quality reports were completed: 

1. Ten Mile River Water Quality Data - 1984. A. River Data 

2. Ten Mile River Water Quality Data - 1984. A. Impoundment Data 

3. Ten Mile River Water Quality Data - 1984. B. Wastewater Discharge 

Data 

4. Ten Mile River Hydraulic Profile - 1984. 



Ill 



5. Bilogical Assessment of Water Pollution in the Ten Mile River - 1985 

6. Ten Mile River Chronic Toxicity Testing - 1984. 

7. Ten Mile River Acute Toxicity Testing - 1984. 

8. Ten Mile River Modeling Report - 1985. 

9. Ten Mile River Sediment Microtox Study - 1986. 

10. 1984-1985 French & Quinebaug Rivers Water Quality and Wastewater 

Discharge Data. 

11. 1985 Ipswich River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

12. 1985 North Coastal River Basin Water Quality Data. 

13. 1985 Chicopee River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

14. 1985 Blackstone River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

15. 1985 Millers River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

16. 1985 Hoosic River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

17. 1985 Boston Harbor Water Quality Data. 

18. 1984-1985 Assabet River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

19. 1984 Charles River Water Quality Data. 

20. 1985 Nashua River Water Quality and Wastewater Discharge Data. 

21. A Study of Metals Removal in Massachusetts Wastewater Treatment 

Faci lities. 



The 1986 Summary of Water Quality (305(B)) was prepared and published. 
This report described water quality conditions and trends in all the river 
basins of the Commonwealth. 

Water quality analyses were completed for 1985 data from the Assabet 
River, Chicopee River, Blackstone River, Hoosic River, Nashua River, 
Rumford River, and the Westfield River. Part C Reports for the French and 
Quinebaug River Basin and the North River Basin were prepared and are in 
draft form. Analyses of 1985 wastewater discharge data from the Upper 
Blackstone Wastewater Treatment Plant was completed. 



112 



Technical Evaluations of Water Quality Issues Related to Construction 
Grants Activities 

Ten facility plans and sixty-six NPDES permits were reviewed. Staff 
members attended public hearings regarding the development of NPDES permit 
limitations for dischargers to the Ten Mile River and the lower Connecticut 
River. Three anti-degration waiver applications were reviewed,- and the 
projected impact of a fishery discharge to a low flow, anti-degradation 
water was analyzed. NPDES permit limits were developed for 17 dischargers 
to the Ten Mile River and for New England Apple products. 

Lower Connecticut River Combined Sewer Overflow Project 

Considerable staff time was devoted to this project. The contract with 
the consultant for the Phase II study was developed and executed. The pro- 
ject was initiated in December, and monthly staff meetings were attended. 
A contract was also developed with the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission 
for their continued participation in the program. 

Conferences and Meetings 

Significant conferences and training included: 

1. A four day conference on use of the PC version of SWMM was attended 
by one staff member. 

2. A two day ASCE Environmental Engineering Section conference was 
attended by two staff members. 

3. Four staff members attended a two day toxics modelling workshop. 

4. Two staff members attended the New England Association of 
Environmental Biologists Conference. Staff members gave talks on 
the Ten Mile monitoring program and permit development, Ten Mile 
River hydrological studies, the TSB's marine program, and Boston 
Harbor. 

5. One staff member attended a four day statistics course, sponsored 
by DEQE. 

6. One staff member attended a four day course on the chemistry of 
soil and water contamination. 

7. Three staff members attended a week long course on mathematical 
modelling of water quality toxic substances held at Manhattan 
Col lege. 



113 



Biology Section 

The Division's Biology Section has the responsibility for three 
programs: (1) Research and Demonstration, (2) Water Quality Standards and 

(3) Biomonitoring. The section is staffed with nine (9) full time and four 

(4) seasonal employees. 

The Research and Demonstration Program provides funding for scientific 
and engineering studies on specific environmental problems. During FY'85 
nine (9) new projects were designed to investigate acid rain, various forms 
of toxic pollution, and train Division personnel. In addition there were 
28 existing projects making a total of 37 active projects during the year. 
During the year nine projects were completed and produced final reports. 
One of these reports was a nine volume Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts. 

New Water Quality Standards for surface waters were formally adopted in 
FY'85. U.S. EPA gave their approval of the standards after the necessary 
public meetings and hearings. Substantial changes were not made, but are 
expected in the next round when the Division plans to address toxic pollu- 
tants in detail. 

The Biomonitoring Program is relatively new to the Division. Its pur- 
pose is to supply the necessary biological sampling and analysis to support 
and augment more traditional chemical sampling program, and to provide 
interpretations and information to the regulatory program for permit eva- 
luation of toxic substances. Five full time and four seasonal employees 
are used to collect data on plankton, periphyton, macrophyton, macroinver- 
tebrates, and fish. Toxicity testing is also carried out to a limited 
extent. During FY'85 major biomonitoring surveys were conducted on the 
Blackstone, Nashua, Hoosic, Ten Mile, French and Parker rivers. Four 
industrial site assessment were conducted. Special fish flesh sampling for 
Dioxin and PCB contamination was initiated. Along with the assessment of 
alternative bacterial indicators of pollution. The systematic screening of 
municipal discharges with the Microtox Toxicity Analyzer was begun. 
Members of the staff attended and presented papers at the North American 
Benthological Society's Conference, the New England Association of 
Environmental Biologist annual meeting, the Northeast Section of the 
American Fisheries Society and the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Conference. 

New Projects 

Project Consultant Cost 

80-30 In Service Training — $ 25,000 

84-26 The Surface Hydrology and 

Wetland Roles in Acid Dep- M.I.T. $ 39,079 

osition on the Bickford 
Pond Watershed 



114 



New Projects (Cont.) 



Project 
84-38 Technical Writing Course 
85-05 Dioxin II 



85-06 Quincy Bay Study 

85-18 Analysis of Contaminants 
in Marine Finfish & Shell 
fish 

85-21 Ten Mile River Analysis 

85-30 Oesign of A Study on 

Statewide Drinking Water 
Quality 



Consultant 

Garber I Souda, Assoc. 

Midwest Center for Mass 
Spectrometry 

Camp, Dresser & McKee, Inc. 

U.Mass, Boston 



Dr. Wil 1 iam Jobin 



U. Mass 



85-32 Mass. Streamflow Program U.S. Geological Survey 



Cost 
$ 5,410 
$ 20,000 

$ 39,950 
$ 37,727 

$ 15,000 
$ 14,300 

$150,100 



Existing Projects 



Project 

80-28 Installation and Evaluation 
of a Waterless Toi let 

81-09-1 Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Mass. 
Streams 

81-09-2 Falmouth Landfill Study 

81-09-3 French and Quinebaug River 
Basins Atlas Study 



Consultant Cost 

Mass. Audubon Society $ 24,225 

U.S. Geological Survey $174,000 

U.S. Geological Survey $ 50,000 

U.S. Geological Survey $180,000 



81-09-4 Distribution of Polychlorin- U.S. Geological Survey $134,600 
ated Biphenyls in the Housa- 
tonic River and Adjacent Aquifer 

81-09-5 Solute Transport Modeling of U.S. Geological Survey $ 96,900 
a Sewage Treatment Plant Plume 



115 



Existing Projects (Cont.) 



Project 

85-15 Demonstration of Reduction 
of Excessive Water Main 
Pressure as A Means of 
Decreasing Residential 
Water Use 

82-22 Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Operator Training Program 

83-11-1 Quality of Precipitation 
Deposited by Air Masses 
Moving Over Massachusetts 

83-11-2 Effects of Atmospheric 
Deposition on the Water 
Quality of Two Tributaries 
to the Quabbin Reservoir 
in Central Massachusetts 

83-11-3 Techniques for Estimating 
Reaeration Coefficients 
and Travel Times in Mass. 
Streams 

83-11-4 Hydrology of a Floodplain 
Wetland and its Influence 
on Streamwater Quality in 
Massachusetts 



Consultant 

Boston Water & Sewer 
Commission 



Camp, Dresser & McKee 



U.S. Geological Survey 



U.S. Geological Survey 



U.S. Geological Survey 



U.S. Geological Survey 



Cost 



$ 32,417 



$153,000 
$225,000 

$352,800 



$260,000 



$252,000 



83-25 Drinking Water Sodium Study U. Mass School of Health 

Sciences 



83-31-1 Biological Removal of 
Phosphorus 

83-31-2 Attachment of Biofilms/ 
Biological Anaerobic 
Fluidized Bed 

83-31-3 Chemical Conditioning of 
Municipal Wastewater 
Sludges Using Polyaluminum 
Chloride 



U.Mass Dept. of Civil 
Engineering 

U.Mass Dept. of Civl 
Engineering 



U.Mass Dept. of Civil 
Engineering 



$ 9,741 
$ 62,458 
$ 75,317 



$ 44,088 



116 



Existing Projects (Cont.) 

Project Consultant Cost 

83-31-5 Assessing Chemical Toxicants U.Mass Dept. of Civil • $ 51,436 

to Anaerobic Methanogenic Engineering 
Bacteria Using the Microtox 
Bioluminescent Toxicity 
Analyzer 

83-31-6 Joint Action of Toxicant U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 53,273 

Mixutes on Daphnia pulex Engineering 

83-31-7 Research Using the Algal U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 80,828 

Assay: Bottle Test (AA:BT) Engineering 

83-31-8 Algal Assay Short Course U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 45,925 

Engineering 

83-31-9 Mathematical Modelling of U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 67,969 

Heavy Metals in the Natural Engineering 
Environment: Aluminum 
Toxicity in Relation to 
Acid Rain 

83-31-10 Identification and Evalua- U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 51,436 

tion of Groundwater Waste- Engineering 
load Allocation Methods 

83-31-11 Control of Localized Ground- U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 75,317 

water Contamination with Engineering 
Polymer Injection 

83-31-12 Pilot Scale Implementation U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 42,251 

of DTECTR Using Decentral- Engineering 
ized Microcomputers 

83-31-13 Sediment Toxicity Testing U.Mass Dept. of Civil $ 31,394 

Using the Microtox Analyzer Engineering 

84-14 The Metropolitan District Lawrence Experiment $185,000 

Commission Infiltration/ Station 
Inflow Study 

84-31 Metropolitan District Urban Systems & Engineer- $ 21,217 

Commission Sludge Manage- ing Inc. 
ment Alternatives Comparison 
Program 



117 



Final Reports on Completed Projects 



Anonymous. 1984. Infiltration/Inflow Study of the MDC South Metropolitan 
Sewer District for the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering. 
Camp, Dresser L McKee, Inc. Boston, ii + 18 pp + Appendices. 

Anonymous. 1984. Demonstration of Pressure Reduction As a Means' of Water 
Conservation. Research and Demonstration Project 81-15. Boston Water and 
Sewer Commission, Boston, viii + 32 pp. 

Anonymous. 1985. Drogue Tracking Studies in Quincy Bay. Research and 
Demonstration Project 85-06. Camp, Dresser & McKee, Inc., Boston, iv + 20 
pp + Appendices. 

Briggs, J.C. and W.D. Silvey. 1984. Source, Movement, and Effects of 
Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Three Ponds in the Headwaters of Hop Brook, 
Marlborough, Massachusetts. Water Resources Investigations Report 84-4017. 
U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 55 pp. 

Gay, F.B. and M.H. Frimpter. 1984. Distibution of Polychlorinated Biphenyls 
in the Housatonic River and Adjacent Aquifer, Massachusetts. Open-file 
Report 84-588. U.S. Geological Survy, Boston, iv + 34 pp. 

Havis, R.N., D.D. Adrian, R.R. Noss, and D.W. Ostendorf. 1983. A 
Mathematical Model of Phosphorus in Completely Mixed Lakes with Special 
Application to Lake Warner, Massachusetts. Environmental Engineering 
Report 78-83-9. University of Massachussetts, Department of Civil 
Engineering, Amherst, xi + 152 pp. 

Marchaj, D. and M.S. Switzenbaum. 1983. Dewatering of Sewage Sludge on 
Ganular Coal. Environmental Engineering Report 75-83-6. University of 
Massachusetts, Department of Civil Engineering, Amherst, x + 152 pp. 

Sneehan, K.D., K.E. Sellers, and N.M. Ram. 1984. Establishment of a 
Microtox Laboratory and Presentations of Several Case Studies Using 
Microtox Data. Environmental Engineering Report 77-83-8. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic Characteristics of Streams 
in Massachusetts - Coastal River Basins of the North Shore and 
Massachusetts Bay. Water Resources Investigations Report 84-4281. U.S. 
Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 60 pp. 

Wandle, S.W. Jr. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic Characteristics of Streams 
in Massachusetts - Connecticut River Basin. Water Resources Investigations 
Report 84-4282. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 110 pp. 

Wandle, S.W. Jr. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic Characteristics of Streams 
in Massachusetts - Hudson River Basin. Water Resources Investigations 
Report 83-4250. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 24 pp. 



118 






Wandle, S.W., Jr. and R.A. Fontaine. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Merrimack River Basins Water 
Resources Investigations Report 84-4284. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, 
iv + 54 pp. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. and G.R. Keezer. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Taunton and Ten Mile River 
Basins and Coastal River Basins of Mount Hope Bay, Narragansett Bay, and 
Rhode Island Sound. Water Resources Investigations Report 84-4283. U.S. 
Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 38 pp. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. and J. A. LeBlanc. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Thames River Basin. Water 
Resources Investigations Report 84-4287. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, 
iv + 27 pp. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. and R.G. Lippert. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Housatonic River Basin. 
Water Resources Investigations Report 84-4285. U.S. Geological Survey, 
Boston, iv + 30 pp. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. and M.A. Morgan. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Coastal River Basins of the 
South Shore and Buzzards Bay. Water Resources Investigations Report 
84-4288. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 30 pp. 

Wandle, S.W., Jr. and A.F. Phipps. 1984. Gazetteer of Hydrologic 
Characteristics of Streams in Massachusetts - Blackstone River Basin. 
Water Resources Investigations Report 84-4286. U.S. Geological Survey, 
Boston, iv + 26 pp. 

The Division's Biology and R+D Section has the responsibility for three 
programs (1) Research and Demonstration; (2) Water Quality Standards and 

(3) Biomonitoring. The section is staffed with ten (10) full-time and four 

(4) seasonal employees. 

Research and Demonstration Program 



The Research and Demonstration Program is responsible for conducting 
scientific studies on specific environmental problems related to water 
pollution. The R+D Section initiates new projects, reviews proposals, pre- 
pares contracts for research, monitors projects for administrative and 
technical value, and assures that technology and scientific findings are 
transferred to those who need them. 



119 



There are thirty-one existing projects with a total value of 
$3,777,575. The Division's share of this program is $1,951,220. In addi- 
tion, current projections and efforts are aimed at initiating some twenty- 
two new projects with an estimated value of $1,390,000. To a large extent, 
new projects will replace projects scheduled for completion. 12 projects 
were completed this year and have produced final reports. 

New Projects 



Project 








No. 


Project 
In Service Training 


Consultant 

— — 


Cost 


80-30 


$ 25,000 


86-06-1 


Quality of Precipitation II 


U.S.G.S. 


149,850 


86-06-2 


Reaeration II 


U.S.G.S. 


142,500 


86-06-3 


Cape Cod Radar 


U.S.G.S. 


64,000 



Existing Projects 



Project 
No. 

80-28 

80-22 

83-11-1 

83-11-2 

83-11-3 

83-11-4 

83-25 

83-31-1 

83-31-2 

83-31-3 

83-31-4 

83-31-5 



Project 
Waterless Toilet 
STP Simulation 
Quality of Precipitation 
Quabbin Reservoir 
Reaeration I 
Wetlands-River Quality 
Sodium Study 
Bio Phosphorus Removal 
Attachment of Biofilm 
Sludge Conditioning 
Septic Systems 
Microtox and Anaerobic Systems U.Mass 



Consultant 


Cost 


Mass. Audubon 


$ 24,225 


CDM 


153,000 


U.S.G.S. 


127,500 


U.S.G.S. 


88,200 


U.S.G.S. 


130,000 


U.S.G.S. 


126,000 


U.Mass 


9,741 


U.Mass 


37,400 


U.Mass 


45,100 


U.Mass 


41,800 


U.Mass 


26,400 


U.Mass 


30,800 



120 



Projec 
No. 


:t 


Project 
Daphnia Bioassay 


Consu Itant 
U.Mass 


Cost 


83-31- 


-6 


$ 31,900 


83-31- 


•7 


Algal Assay 


U.Mass 


48,400 


83-31- 


-8 


Algal Assay Course 


U.Mass 


27,500 


83-31- 


-9 


Aluminum Model ing 


U.Mass 


40,700 


83-31- 


-10 


Groundwater Wasteloads 


U.Mass 


30,800 


83-31- 


•11 


Groundwater Polymer 


U.Mass 


45,100 


83-31- 


•12 


Detector 


U.Mass 


25,300 


83-31- 


•13 


Sediment Microtox 


U.Mass 


18,799 


84-14 




L.E.S. Toxics 


LES 


185,000 


84-26 




Bickford Pond 


M.I.T. 


39,078 


85-05 




Dioxin II 


U.Nebraska 


20,000 


85-18 




Boston Harbor Shellfish 


U. Mass/Boston 


37,727 


85-21 




Ten Mile River 


Rumford River Assoc 


15,000 


85-30 




Corrosivity 


WRRC 


14,300 


85-32 




Stream Gaging 

Published Technical 


U.S.G.S 
Reports 


150,000 



73-04 Guswa, J.H. and D.R. LeBlanc. 1985. Digital Models of Groundwater 
Flow in the Cape Cod Aquifer System, Massachusetts. Water-Supply 
Paper 2209. United States Geological Survey, Boston, vi + 112 p. 

73-04 LeBlanc, D.R. 1984. Sewage Plume in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, 
Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Water Supply Paper 2218. U.S. 
Geological Survey, Boston, iv + 28 p. 

76-24 Gay, F.B. 1985. Estimated Water and Nutrient Inflows and 

Outflows - Lake Cochituate, Eastern Massachusetts, 1977-1979. 
Water-Resources Investigations Report 84-4315. U.S. Geological 
Survey, Boston, vi + 59 p. + map. 



121 



77-12 Wei, I.W. 1986. Installation and Evaluation of Permeable 

Pavement at Walden Pond State Reservation. Research and 

Demonstration Project 77-12. Northeastern University, Department 
of Civil Engineering, Boston, ii + 306 p. + glossary. 

80-32-1 Switzenbaum, M.S., K.C. Sheehan, and R.F. Hickey. 1984. 

Anaerobic Treatment of Municipal Wastewater. Environmental 
Engineering Report 76-83-7. University of Massachusetts, 
Department of Civil Engineering, Amherst, viii + 75 p. 

80-32-2 Noss, R.R., L. Ruh, and K.T. Lautz. 1984. Computerized Monthly 
Wastewater Treatment Plant Reporting. Env. Eng. Report 81-83-12. 
University of Massachusetts, Department of Civil Engineering, 
Amherst, v + 45 p. 

80-32-3 Griffin, R.H. and R.R. Noss. 1985. Wastewater Management 

Alternatives for Rural Lakefront Communities. Env. Eng. Report 
82-83-13. University of Massachusetts, Department of Civil 
Engineering, Amherst, xii + 129 p. 

81-09-2 Persky, J.H. 1986. Direction of Groundwater Flow and Groundwater 
Quality Near a Landfill in Falmouth, Massachusetts. 
Water-Resources Investigations Report 85-4188. U.S. Geological 
Survey, Boston, iv + 24 p. 

82-16-1 Gadoury, R.A., J. A. Smath, and R.A. Fontaine. 1985. 

Cost-Effectiveness of the U.S. Geological Survey's Stream-Gaging 
Programs in Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Water-Resources 
Investigations Report 84-4097. U.S. Geological Survey, Boston, 
vi + 78 p. 

83-31-13 Atkinson, D.S., N.M. Ram, and M.S. Switzenbaum. 1985. Evaluation 
of the Microtox Analyzer for Assessment of Sediment Toxicity. 
Env. Eng. Report 86-85-3. University of Massachusetts, 
Department of Civil Engineers, Amherst, iv + 63 p. 

84-28 Anonymous. 1985. Infiltration/Inflow Study of the MDC South 
Metroplitan Sewer District for the Department of Environmental 
Quality Engineering. Research and Demonstration Project 84-28. 
Camp Dresser & McKee, Inc., Boston, ii + 18 p. + Appendices. 

85-21 Jobin, W.R. 1986. The Institutional and Conceptual Development 
of Methodologies for Control of Toxicants in Massachusetts 
Rivers: The Ten Mile River Case Study. Rumford River 
Laboratories, Foxborough. iii + 30 p. + Appendices. 



122 



Water Quality Standards Program 



The Water Quality Standards Program is responsible for updating and 
revising standards, reviewing criteria, and classifying the waters of the 
Commonwealth. Revised standards were approved by EPA in FY ' 85 and updates 
occur approximately e^jery three years. 

During FY'86 a committee representing the Division's Regulatory 
Branch, Construction Grants, Technical Services Branch, and Legal Section 
met on several policy issues. An interim Combined Sewer Overflow Policy 
was drafted and submitted for peer review. A revised anti-degradation 
policy was drafted. This policy would revise the current classification 
system and result in extensive changes to the current standards. A separate 
committee is working on developing a toxics policy to incorporate biologi- 
cal toxicity testing into the state permit system. 

Smaller studies were completed on dissolved oxygen and temperature 
criteria. An analysis of low flow data for Massachusetts was conducted and 
the state's mixing zone policy was reviewed. Special studies are being 
conducted to evaluate new bacterial indicators of pollution and instream 
chlorine toxicity. 

Biomonitorinq Program 



The Biomonitoring Program is an integral part of the state-wide 
quality monitoring program which is authorized by the Massachusetts Clean 
Waters Act, Section 27, paragraph 5. The importance of the program is 
recognized in the "Declaration of Goals and Policy," Section 101(a) of 
Public Law 92-500 which stresses the need to restore the biological 
integrity of the nation's waters and achieve a water quality which provides 
for the protection and propagation of aquatic life. 

The Biomonitoring Program conducts appropriate biological sampling and 
analyses to supplement traditional water quality monitoring programs and 
makes recommendations to the Regulatory Branch with regard to the control 
of toxic substances through the NPDES permitting process. Six full-time and 
four seasonal employees are used to collect data on plankton, periphyton, 
macrophyton, macroinvertebrates, and fish. Fiscal year 1986 was marked by 
the addition of a full-time Junior Biochemist to the staff to carry out 
toxicity analyses with the Microtox toxicity analyzer. Furthermore, plans 
and specifications were developed for the establishment of a toxicity 
testing laboratory at the TSB office in Westborough. The laooratory will 
be housed in a trailer-type unit and all toxicity testing functions will be 
conducted in this facility including Microtox, acute testing with Daphnia 
sp. and fathead minnows, and Ceriodaphnia chronic toxicity testing. 



123 



Biomonitoring surveys were conducted in the following waterbodies 
during FY'86: 

Ware River 

Buzzards Bay 

Mil lers River 

South Meadow Pond (Clinton) 

Seven Mile River 

Bungay River 

Mason Brook (Townsend) 

The following reports and technical memoranda were completed during 
FY'86: 

Reports 

- Standard Operating Procedures Manual (April, 1986) 

- The Biological Assessment of Water Pollution in the Ten Mile River 
Basin (February, 1986) 

- Report of Fisheries Investigation to Screen for 2,3,7,8 
Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin Associated with the Baird & McGuire 
Hazardous Waste site, Holbrook, Massachusetts (October, 1985) 

Technical Memoranda 

- Toxics in Fish Data from Flint Pond, Tyngsboro (June, 1986) 

- Townsend Sanitary Landfill - Water Quality Sampling (December, 1985) 

- Hocomonco Pond (Westborough ) Fish Sampling Data (April, 1986) 

- Summary of Microtox Data (April, 1986) 

- Results of PCB Sampling of the Millers River (June, 1986) 

Finally, selected personnel attended or presented papers at meetings 
of the New England Association of Environmental Biologists, North American 
Benthological Society, Water Pollution Control Federation, Northeast 
Section of the American Fisheries Society, and New England Water Pollution 
Control Association. 



Lakes Section 

The Massachusetts Clean Lakes and Great Ponds Program, as created 
under Chapter 628 of the Acts of 1961, is now entering its fifth year of 
funding. The program has proven to be popular with cities and towns during 
FY'83, FY'84, FY'85, and FY'86 and will probably remain so in FY'87. In 
fact, 60 Requests for Assistance were received for FY'87. Until FY'86 the 
Division was able to make grant offers to all eligible applicants. As many 
of the projects progressed from Phase I to Phase II projects. During the 
FY'86 funding year we had to issue an extended eligibility list. 



124 




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126 



Five projects were completed under the Eutrophication and Nuisance 
Aquatic Vegetation Control Program during FY'86: Ell Pond, Melrose; 
Dorothy Pond, Mi 1 1 bury; Lake Noquochoke, Dartmouth and Turnpike; and 
Mirimichi Lakes, Plainville. 

The Lakes Section is also currently administering four major restora- 
tion projects under the federal 314 Clean Lakes Program: Lake Cochituate, 
Natick/Framingham/Wayland; Porter Lake, Springfield; Dunn Pond, Gardner; 
and Lake Lashaway, East and North Brookfield. 

The staff level for the Clean Lakes Program increased during FY'86 
from six to nine full-time employees. Support activities were also given 
legal and accounting activities. 

Following a list of FY'83, FY'34, FY'85, and FY'86 projects receiving 
partial funding under the Clean Lakes Program. 



MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 
GRANT ELIGIBILITY LIST 
FY'83 







STATE 


LOCAL 


MUNICIPALITY 


LAKE 


GRANT(S) 


SHARE (S) 


East Brookfield 


Lake Lashway 


$100,254 


$ 64,540 


Gardner 


Dunn Pond 


312. 


,500 


312,500 


Brookfield 


Quaboag & Quacumquasit Pond 


49 


,000 


21,000 


North Reading 


Martins Pond 


33 


,000 


17,000 


Westfield 


Pequot Pond 


42. 


,000 


18,000 


Wakefield 


Lake Quannapowitt 


52 


,000 


22,500 


Hopkinton 


North Pond 


36 


,750 


25,750 


Amherst 


Puffers Pond 


42. 


,000 


18,000 


Sturbridge 


Walker Pond 


42 


,000 


18,000 


Way land 


Dudley Pond 


72. 


,750 


72,750 


Holliston 


Lake Winthrop 


15 


,750 


6,750 


Hami 1 ton 


Chebaco Lake 


42. 


,000 


18,000 


Montery&New Marlborough 


Lake Buel 


47 


,000 


47,000 


Southwick 


Congamond Lakes 


47 


,000 


47,000 


Waltham 


Hardy Pond 


52. 


,500 


22,500 


Yarmouth 


Long Pond 


52. 


,500 


22,500 


Westborough 


Chauncy Pond 


31. 


,500 


13,500 


Northborough 


Bartlett Pond 


52, 


500 


22,500 


Melrose 


Ell Pond 


35. 


,000 


15,000 


Westford 


Forge Pond 


42. 


000 


18,000 


Belchertown 


Metacomet & Arcadia Ponds 


59 


,500 


25,500 


Hoi liston 


Lake Winthrop 


15, 


,000 


15,000 


Sturbridge 


Big Alum Pond 


10 


,500 


4,500 


Springfield 


Porter Lake 


201 


,420 


535,700 


Milford 


Cedar Swamp Pond 


28. 


,000 


12,000 


Springfield 


Lake Massasoit 


52, 


500 


22,500 


Grafton 


Lake Ripple 


42. 


,000 


18,000 


Lynn 


Sluice & Flax Ponds 


91 


,000 


39,000 


Wei lesley 


Morse Pond 


21 


,577 


21,577 


Natick 


Jennings Pond 


35 


,000 


15,000 


Northampton 


Wil low Pond 


65. 


,000 


65,000 


Lynn 


Floating Bridge Pond 


35 


,000 


15,000 



127 



FY'84 







STATE 


LOCAL 


MUNICIPALITY 


LAKE 


GRANT(S) 


SHARE (S) 


Natick 


Lake Cochituate 


$ 49,236 


$ 49,236 


Webster 


Webster Lake 


120,000' 


40,000 


Worcester 


Lake Quinsigamond 


15,400 


6,600 


Springfield 


Springfield Lakes 


140,000 


60,000 


Dracut 


Lake Mascuppic 


24,500 


10,500 


Eastham 


Great Pond 


52,500 


22,500 


Athol 


Lake Ellis 


42,000 


18,000 


Sharon 


Lake Massapoag 


23,100 


9,900 


Sterl ing 


East Lake Waushacum 


10,950 


3,650 


Halifax 


East Monponsett 


42,000 


18,000 


Falmouth 


Ashumet Pond 


52,000 


22,500 


Woburn 


Horn Pond 


52,500 


22,500 


Weymouth 


Whitmans Pond 


121,275 


40,425 


Brookf ield 


Lake Lashaway 


37,500 


12,500 


Shrewsbury 


Flint Pond 


80,400 


26,800 


Dracut 


Lake Mascuppic 


16,500 


5,500 


Westminster 


Wyman Pond 


88,500 


29,500 


Hudson 


Lake Boone 


28,000 


12,000 


Sturbridge 


Cedar Pond 


619 


206 


Georgetown 


Rock & Pentucket Ponds 


77,000 


33,000 


Barnstable 


Wequaquet & Long Ponds 


105,000 


45,000 


Harvard 


Bare Hil 1 Pond 


35,000 


15,000 


Arl ington 


Spy Pond 


303,337 


101,113 


Franklin 


Populatic Pond 


42,000 


18,000 


Sturbridge 


Cedar Pond 


16,875 


5,625 


Holland 


Hamilton Reservior 


30,000 


10,000 


Barnstable 


Shal low Pond 


49,000 


21,000 


Peabody 


Browns Pond 


52,500 


22,500 


Harvard 


Bare Hil 1 Pond 


12,170 


4,055 


P lainvil le 


Turnpike Lake 


42,000 


18,000 


Charlton 


Prindle Pond 


1,875 


625 


Barnstable 


Red Lily Pond 


35,000 


15,000 


Peabody 


Browns Pond 


1,500 


500 


Arlington 


Spy Pond 


7,000 


3,000 


Granby 


Forge Pond 


42,000 


18,000 


Arl ington 


Hills Pond 


31,500 


13,500 


Brookline 


Halls Pond 


42,000 


18,000 


Barnstable 


Red Lily Pond 


33,750 


11,250 


Worcester 


Sal isbury Pond 


42,000 


18,000 


Cambridge 


Balcks Nook 


28,000 


12,000 


Oak Bluffs 


Lagoon Pond 


31,500 


13,500 



128 



FY'85 







STATE 


LOCAL 


MUNICIPALITY 


LAKE 


GRANT(S). 


ShARE(S) 


Pittsfield 


Pontoosuc 


$405,375 


$135,125 


Pittsfield 


Onota Lake 


63,000 


27,000 


Worcester 


Lake Quinsigamond 


56,250 


18,750 


Way! and 


Dudley Pond 


540,000 


180,000 


Richmond 


Richmond Pond 


35,000 


15,000 


Townsend 


Harbor Pond 


56,000 


24,000 


Hardwick 


Hardwick Pond 


11,250 


3,750 


Worcester 


Lake Quinsigamond 


21,000 


9,000 


Winchester 


Upper Mystic Lake 


30,750 


10,250 


Marlborough 


Fort Meadow Reservoir 


59,500 


25,500 


Dracut 


Long Pond 


49,000 


21,000 


West Newbury 


Mill Pond 


31,500 


13,500 


Framing ham 


Waushakum Pond 


52,500 


22,500 


Holiston 


Lake Winthrop 


97,500 


32,500 


Westminster 


Wyman Pond 


19,500 


6,500 


Wilmington 


Silver Lake 


42,000 


18,000 


New Bedford 


Buttonwood Pond 


49,000 


21,000 


Mi 1 lbury 


Dorothy Pond 


202,500 


67,500 


Hopkinton 


North Pond 


30,000 


10,000 


Lunenburg 


Shirley Reservoir 


63,000 


27,000 


Holbrook 


Lake Holbrook 


38,500 


16,500 


Newton 


Bullough's Pond 


40,600 


17,400 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 

GRANT ELIGIBILITY LIST 
FY 1986 



MUNICIPALITY 

Worcester 

Woburn 

Amherst 

Weymouth 

Sturbridge 

Groton 

Worcester 

Pion. Valley PI. Com, 

Brookf ield 

Yarmouth 

Lynn 



LAKE/POND 

Indian Lake 
Horn Pond 
Puffer's Pond 
Whitmans Pond 
Walker Pond 
Lost Lake/Knops Pond 
Indian Lake 
Pequot Pond 

Quaboag/Quacumquasit Ponds 
Long Pond 

Sluice/Flax/Floating Brdg. 
Ponds 



$ 



STATE 


LOCAL 


GRANT 


MATCH 


22,400 5 


& 9,600 


625,125 


208,375 


254,100 


84,700 


215,850 


71,950 


1,305,000 


435,000 


61,600 


26,400 


7,500 


2,500 


52,500 


17,500 


80,250 


26,750 


150,000 


50,000 


1,125,000 


375,000 



129 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 

GRANT ELIGIBILITY LIST (Cont.) 
FY 1986 



MUNICIPALITY LAKE/POND 

Plymouth Billington Sea 

Reading Martins Pond 

Pembroke Furnace Pond 

Melrose Ell Pond 

Belchertown Lake Metacomet/Lake Arcadia 

Groton Lost Lake/Knops Pond 

Holland Hamilton Reservoir 

Westminster Wyman Pond 

Monterey Lake Buel 

Easthampton Hashawannuck Pond 

Holden Eagle Lake 

Sturbridge Big Alum Pond 

Westborough Lake Chauncy 

Belchertown Lake Arcadia 

Bedford Fawn Lake 

Wilmington Silver Lake 

Charlton Prindle Pond 

Pembroke Little Sandy Bottom Pond 

Pembroke Oldham Pond 

Pembroke Stetson Pond 

Hardwick Hardwick Pond 

Waltham Hardy Pond 

Winchester Wedge Pond 

Hamilton Chebacco Lake 

Wakefield Lake Quannapowitt 

Cohasset Little Harbor Pond 

Hingham Foundry Pond 

Springfield Dimmock Pond 



STATE 


LOCAL 


GRANT 


MATCH 


$ 56,000 3 


1 24,000 


22,500 


7,500 


59,500 


25,500 


150,000 


50,000 


i 18,750 


6,250 


18,750 


6,250 


30,000 


10,000 


18,750 


6,250 


403,500 


134,500 


56,000 


24,000 


150,000 


50,000 


114,773 


38,257 


228,000 


76,000 


11,250 


3,750 


24,500 


10,500 


50,400 


21,600 


31,500 


13,500 


49,000 


21,000 


52,500 


22,500 


56,000 


24,000 


21,000 


9,000 


1,200,000 


400,000 


56,000 


24,000 


45,000 


15,000 


495,000 


165,000 


28,000 


12,000 


38,500 


16,500 


45,500 


19,500 



TOTALS $7,429,998 $2,544,132 



130 



MASSACHUSETTS DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ENGINEERING 

DIVISION OF WATER POLLUTION CONTROL 

CLEAN LAKES PROGRAM 

EXTENDED GRANT ELIGIBILITY LIST 
FY 1986 



MUNCIPALITY 

Springfield 

Charlton 

Belchertown 

Winchester 

Natick 

Springfield 

Winchester 

Ayer 

Springfield 

Northborough 

Bel lingham 

Medway 

Milford 



LAKE /POND 

Porter Lake 

Little Nugget Pond 

Lake Arcadia 

Davidson Park/Judkins/ 
Mill Ponds 

Jennings Pond 

Lake Massasoit 

Winter Pond 

Grove Pond 

Van Horn Pond 

Bartlett Pond 

Box Pond 

Evergreen Cemetery Pond 

Cedar Swamp Pond 

TOTALS 



STATE GRANT 


LOCAL MATCH 


$1,107,450 


$ 


369,150 


43,400 




15,500 


4,875 




1,625 


70,000 




30,000 


333,750 




111,250 


1,242,900 




414,300 


42,000 




18,000 


52,500 




22,500 


66,500 




28,500 


12,750 




4,250 


56,000 


* 


24,000 


7,000 




3,000 


663,750 




221,250 


$3,702,875 


$1 


,263,325 



131 



Compliance Monitoring Section 

The objective of a wastewater discharge survey is to measure the load 
of contaminants placed on the receiving waters and to monitor the discharge 
to assure compliance with the terms of discharge permits. For this pur- 
pose, rates of flow and concentration of the contaminants are measured. 
Since strength or concentration may vary from time to time, sampling tech- 
niques depend on the type of discharge. For example, if a plant operates 
eight hours a day, the survey would extend only over the eight hour period; 
if the plant operates twenty four hours a day, the survey would be con- 
ducted over twenty four hours. When rate of waste flow is variable, volu- 
mes of the several samples are mixed together porportion to flow. This is 
done to provide a composite sample representative of the waste discharge. 
When rate of waste flow is relatively constant, equal volumes of the 
samples are mixed together to provide a composite sample. All samples are 
analyzed according to accepted techniques and the concentration and flow 
rates are reported in publications entitled Part B, Wastewater Discharge. 

The Compliance Monitoring Section supports the work of several DEQE 
sections. The River Basin Section of the Technical Services Branch was 
supported by sampling in most river basins in Massachusetts during the 1986 
fiscal year. The section also works closely with the new Technical 
Assistance Section. The Technical Assistance Section conducts in depth 
surveys at exisiting treatment facilities which are experiencing 
operational difficulties and make recommendations for improving operations 
at these plants. All sampling required as part of the major surveys is 
carried out by the Compliance Monitoring Section. In addition, the section 
responds to sampling requests from each region as well as the Industrial 
Waste and Groundwater Sections of the DWPC. 

A total of 123 major discharges and 56 minor discharges were sampled. 
The 1987 program is projected to sample 125 major permittees and 50 minor 
permittees. Some of these surveys will be large surveys involving several 
weeks of sampling and numerous samples from the units operating within the 
wastewater treatment plants that are evaluated. 

There are eight Isco samplers that are functional. Five more are in 
need of repair and are expected to be ready soon. The Compliance 
Monitoring Section has four full time employees and the use of one vehicle. 
Lack of groundwater sampling equipment and additional transportation are 
the biggest constraints to our program. 

At this time, we have adequate resources to maintain the program for 
the 1987 fiscal year at the same level of effort as 1986. 



132 



NE/MET REGIONAL OFFICE 
FY-86 



The Northeast/Met Regional office is located at 5 Commonwealth Avenue 
in Woburn. This office is responsible for 96 municipalities including the 
following river basins: Boston Harbor, Concord, Charles, Ipswich, 
Merrimack, Mystic, Neponset, North Coastal, Parker, Shawsheen, Weymouth 
Fore and Back, and the Weir. 

Present staffing consists of six (6) engineers and one secretary. 

Due to the large number of Groundwater Wastewater Treatment facilities 
being constructed in this Region, the staff was not able to provide proper 
plan and specification review and approval. Due to this fact the Boston 
Office has provided this function. With the acquisition of the new posi- 
tion the region will be able to assume more of these responsibilities. 

On several occasions the technical assistance section has provided 
invaluable help which the Region could not, in evaluating and correcting 
operation and maintenance problems. This section can be of great 
assistance to the Region in that it provides technical expertise for the 
required period of time, where the Region cannot. 

Again this year training seminars have been provided to Regional per- 
sonnel and has had a great impact on the program especially in the & M 
area. It is hoped this will continue since it can only benefit the entire 
program. 

During FY-86 the following activities were completed: 

ADMINISTRATION 

MANAGEMENT/COORDINATION ACTIVITIES 367 

PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL 

MEETINGS/SUPPORT ACTIVITIES 165 

ENGINEERING REPORT REVIEW 27 

COMPLAINT INVESTIGATION 

COMPLAINTS RECIEVED 299 

COMPLAINTS INVESTIGATED 234 

PERMIT REVIEW 

INDUSTRIAL WASTE DISCHARGE PERMITS 28 

MUNICIPAL WASTE DISCHARGE PERMITS 13 

SUBSUFACE DISCHARGE PERMITS 16 



134 



• 



TITLE V 



PLAN/APPLICATION REVIEW 
SITE INSPECTIONS 
PLAN/APPLICATION APPROVAL 
VARIANCES GRANTED 



128 

100 

64 

125 



OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 



REVIEW OF SELF MONITORING REPORTS 
MAJOR PROBLEM PERMITTEE INSPECTIONS 
MINOR PROBLEM PERMITTEE INSPECTIONS 
NON PROBLEM PERMITTEE INSPECTIONS 
MEETINGS ATTENDANCE 



2033 

159 

197 

67 

20 



TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 



PLANT ASSISTANCE WITH T.A. UNIT 
PLANT ASSISTANCE WITH REG. PERSONNEL 



6 




ENFORCEMENT 



ENFORCEMENT CASES PREPARED 



36 



IN-SERVICE TRAINING 



TRAINING COURSE, SEMINAR, CONFERENCE 
ATTENDANCE 



27 



135 



Southeast Regional Office 



The Water Pollution Control Section is located Lakeville Hospital 
Complex, Route 105 in Lakeville and presently has an engineering staff of 
an Associate, Principal, two (2) Senior and two (2) Assistant Sanitary 
Engineers. 



Requests for approval of plans for privately owned wastewater treat- 
ment facilities and Title 5 related issues continues to create a signifi- 
cant impact on the manpower resources of the Section due to extensive 
growth in Southeastern Massachusetts. 

The full time effort of two (2) engineers and to a lesser degree 
involvement of the remaining staff cannot meet the needs of that program 
and as a consequence the other objectives of the Program Plan are not being 
adequately met. 

Septage management for small communities that utilize lagoons as a 
means for septage disposal has become problematical because of groundwater 
permitting requirements. As a result, an intensive effort is being made to 
conduct inspections of both the illegal facilities and those that have been 
approved by the Department in order to establish schedules by which Class I 
Groundwater Quality Standards can be met which will require communities to 
investigate long term septage options such as co-disposal at a wastewater 
or septage treatment facility. 

Several Complex Title 5 cases were referred to the Attorney General's 
Office for resolution during the period. 

The following tasks were accomplished during fiscal 1986: 

Pollution Complaints Investigated 56 

Review Self Monitoring Reports 852 

Attendance at Meetings & Hearings 177 

Prepare Cases for Enforcement 14 

Issue Administrative Orders 7 

Issue Notice of Violation 9 

Title 5 Reviews and Approvals 455 

Engineering Report Reviews 20 

Discharge Permits Reviewed (Surface) 13 

Discharge Permits Reviewed (Groundwater) 107 



136 



CENTRAL REGIONAL OFFICE 
JULY 1, 1984 - JUNE 31, 1985 



The Central Regional Office is located at 75 Grove Street, Worcester, 
MA 01605 and serves a total of 80 municipalities in Worcester and portions 
of Norfolk and Middlesex Counties. 

The regional engineering staff presently consists of an Associate, 
Principal, Senior and Junior Sanitary Engineering position plus a Senior 
Sanitary Engineering Aide position. 

The Central Region currently has a total of 39 municipal wastewater 
treatment facilities and approximately 103 industrial surface discharge 
permittees. In addition, approximately 30 groundwater discharge permits 
have been issued for domestic or industrial discharges in the region. This 
number is currently growing almost weekly. 

The region is experiencing extensive growth development, with greatest 
intensity along the 1-495, 1-290 and Route 9 corridors. Since many com- 
munities in these areas are unsewered, those programs related to ground- 
water discharges (Title 5 and the groundwater discharge permit program) 
have experienced significant increases in workload. In addition, many of 
the sewered communities along the Assabet River and Millers River are 
currently in the process of upgrading or expanding their municipal 
wastewater collection and treatment systems. These projects have also 
placed additional burdens on the regional staff. Some of these treatment 
facilities will be treating increasing amounts of industrial wastes which 
will place greater emphasis on the regional staff to ensure that industrial 
pretreatment programs are keeping pace. 

As noted above, the Central Region contains many growing unsewered com- 
munities which generate increasing amounts of septage to be disposed. To 
date the number of available wastewater treatment facilities have not been 
sufficient to handle the amount of septage generated. Greater emphasis 
will therefore be needed on the septage and sludge disposal programs. 

In spite of limited staffing and the fact the section chief position 
was vacant over four months, the Section was able to perform a majority of 
the program plan goals. 

The following tables show the accomplishments of the Section for State 
Fiscal Year 1986. 



ADMINISTRATION 

PROGRAM PLAN PROGRESS 

SUPPORT ACTIVITIES - GENERAL LETTERS, MEMOS, MEETINGS 



4 
388 



137 



COMPLAINTS 

TELEPHONE COMPLAINTS/INQUIRIES 892 

COMPLAINT FIELD INVESTIGATION/FOLLOW-UP 62 

PLAN/PERMIT REVIEW 

ENGINEERING REPORTS AND PLANS 23 

INDUSTRIAL WASTE DISCHARGE PERMITS 24 

MUNICIPAL WASTE DISCHARGE PERMITS 7 

SUBSURFACE DISCHARGE PERMITS 26 

TITLE 5 

REVIEW TITLE 5 PLANS, INSPECTIONS 324 

APPROVE TITLE 5 PLANS AND VARIANCES, INSPECTIONS 91 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE 

REVIEW SELF-MONITORING REPORTS 1600 

INSPECT MAJOR PROBLEM PERMITTEES 94 

INSPECT MINOR PROBLEM PERMITTEES 33 

INSPECT NON-PROBLEM PERMITTEES 81 

FOLLOW-UP MEETINGS 55 



138 



WESTERN REGIONAL OFFICE 



FISCAL YEAR 1986 



The Western Regional Office (WRO) is located with other DEQE Divisions 
in the old Federal Post Office building at 436 Dwight Street, Springfield. 
This office serves the areas of Berkshire, Franklin, Hampshire and Hampden 
Counties, a total of 101 Cities and Towns. 

The program plan mandates for DWPC activities in these 101 Cities and 
Towns is currently addressed by a staff of six. They are one Associate, 
Principal, Senior, Assistant and Junior Sanitary Engineers as well as a 
Senior Clerk-Stenographer, the person who enables the rest of us to get the 
work accomplished. 

This year this office spent a considerable amount of time (0.29 man 
years) in the review, for re-issuance, of 51 NPDES permits. This number of 
permit re-issuances more than doubled our program plan projection for the 
number of permits to be reviewed and took almost six times as long as the 
time alloted (0.05 man years). 

The number of Title 5 plan reviews almost doubled in FY'86 (177) from 
FY'85 (90). This is due, in part, to increased attention being directed in 
this area from within the regional office of the Division and from 
increased attention being directed into Title 5 matters at the local level. 

Beneficial reuse of residuals from municipal wastewater treatment, the 
land application of sludge program is currently being staffed full-time by 
the Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (DSHW), yet this regional office 
DWPC staff spent almost 0.1 man years assisting DSHW. 

The complaints received and acted upon by this office increased almost 
53% over FY'85 (from 117 to 179) and this accounted for almost one full man 
year of effort to address, resolve and provide follow-up. 

This office increased the number of wastewater treatment plant inspec- 
tions from 281 in FY'85 to 372 in FY'86 and, at the same time, began the 
permit fee compliance inspection program. 

The biggest change in normal office functions comes in the area of 
enforcement. During FY'85, this figure wasn't tracked as little enfor- 
cement work was initiated. However, in FY'86, there were 43 enforcement 
actions taken and numerous referrals to the Attorney General's Office 
resulting in successful civil suits, other cases still pending. 

The challenge for FY'87 will be to meet the program plan requirements 
and implement the Department's new Administrative Penalties Bill without an 
increase in staffing. 



139 



Below is a list of DWPC/WRO FY'86 activities and man years expended. 

ACTUAL MAN YEARS 

Prepare, Monitor & Report on Program Plan .074 

Performance Evaluations for Employees .056 

Support Activities 8. Clerical 1-635 

Review EIR (MEPA Scoping) -053 

Review Engineering Reports for Construction Grants .081 

Review Wastewater Discharge Permits (NPDES) .290 
Review Pretreatment Plans of Study/Programs & Industrial 

Waste Sections of Facility Plans .101 

Review Sewer Connection/Extension Applications .064 

Review Subsurface Discharge Permits .055 

Process Title 5 Plans, Applications & Inspect Site .513 

Process Title 5 Applications for Variances -178 

Review Sludge Suitability for Land Application Certificates .093 

Evaluate/Respond to Telephone Complaints & Allegations .197 

Field Investigations & Reports .655 

Review Self Monitoring Reports by Permittees .290 

Inspect Problem Permittees -368 

Inspect Minor Problem Permittees -380 

Inspect Non-Problem Permittees -240 

Follow-up Meetings Re: Inspection of Permittees .233 
Technical Assistance to POTW's 

Track Status/Progress of Enforcement Cases .146 

Issue NON's -132 

Administrative Orders -062 

A.G. Referral - 077 
Testify & Provide Technical Assistance in Court 

Operator Certification/Staffing & Evaluation .108 

Staff Training/Conferences & Seminars .278 

Water Supply Chargeback -056 

Wet Side Vehicle Management -109 



140